070720.Combe Down, Weathered Timber Throughout the Day

July 20, 2007 at 2:36 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Combe Down, countryside, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

070629.071.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.069.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.077.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.068.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.076.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.070.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.072.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.073.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage One of Bath’s joys is its incredible stone. Containing just a bit of iron, the stone has a warm creamy color that positively glows at sunrise and sunset. Like Italy, almost the entire place is constructed with the same material, so the color surrounds the viewer and makes the whole rigorously ordered, individualistic, and finely executed pieces of architecture feel as if all part of one piece. As such, Bath is a World Heritage site, rightfully treated as one entity but this singularity on the wealth of Georgian architecture and its unique building material discriminates against the other materials of bath, such as the brick Gothic Cottage of Sion Hill and this engaging more or less modern timber structure, just off Prior Park. Rebel materials in this Bath stone town have enjoyed brief periods of popularity. For instance, when before the Kennet and Avon canal, brick (imported) was far more expensive than finely cut ashlar Bath stone! There is at least one example of a Bath stone house with a one brick thick front facade. I enjoy this house for the same reason, mainly its surrounding Bath stone wall, which you find throughout the city and countryside here. Besides, it has a great view!

070629.080.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark

070719.Bath, Are You There God? It’s Me, Dead Dean

July 19, 2007 at 9:16 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Columns, Corinthian Order, Monuments and Memorials, Sculpture, somerset, Tabernacles | 3 Comments

061002.164.Somset.Bath.Areyoutheregod.itsmedeadBishop Montagu
OK, actually dead Bishop Montague, d. 1618…

Monument designed and built by William Cure, mason. Nicholas Johnson was the carver.

070718. 13/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai’s Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 18, 2007 at 2:17 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, cumulus clouds, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

See the series so far!

061024.019.Somset.Bath.Bathwick.Iconic BathFHH125_c
Perhaps you’ve picked up that this photo was lifted from the archives to compare with Hokusai’s “Soshu Enoshima.”

070717. 12/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai’s Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 17, 2007 at 2:15 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Horses, Overcast, people, somerset | 5 Comments

See the series so far!

07013.47.SO.Bath
FHH113_c
Below, Hokusai’s “Sumidagawa Sekiya no sato”
I could have fudged my photo a bit to make it match. I had been sitting on it for a while, building up a stockpile of horse photos. I could have covered up the blue van, perhaps added some shadow…. but I’m running out of time.

070716.Bathwick, Raby Place

July 16, 2007 at 12:39 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Chisel Marks, doorways, Light and Shadow, somerset | 5 Comments

070712.14.SO.Bath
Click here for whole block.
070712.12.SO.Bath
Click here for a section without an added balcony but with all the restored/original sill windows (without Victorian plate glass).
On Bathwick Hill Road immediately after St. Mary the Virgin Church (and thus on the slope Bathwick Hill) lies Raby Place, designed by John Pinch the Elder between 1818-1825. The street name was originally Church Street (and remains so on my really outdated ordinance map). This series of eighteen two-bay terrace houses features Pinch’s famous design of a ramped cornice, similar to what can be found on a staircase banister and equally appropriate when one tries climbing this hill while carrying a litre of milk and some groceries. (Also see the same ramped cornice detailing on Cavendish Place, also by Pinch)

070712.11.SO.Bath
Click here to see the whole block.

070715.Bathwick, The Legendary Pitstop of the Headless Horse and Man

July 15, 2007 at 8:11 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Bridges, Horses, Overcast, people, Pulteney Bridge, river, River Avon, somerset | 2 Comments

On Pultney Bridge.
070628.51.SO.Bath.PulteneyBr.TaxiCarriage070628.52.SO.Bath.PulteneyBr.TaxiCarriage

070714.Bathwick, “Explicit hoc totum; Pro Christo da Mihi Potum”

July 14, 2007 at 12:11 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Columns, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Mansion, Museums, people, somerset, University of Bath, Window | 2 Comments

From the archives now: last day of class party in front of the Holborne Museum. The first day of class also ended in the Holborne Museum for drinks. It was quite enjoyable but with cases of champaign, one must remember that the grades aren’t all in yet and to just keep it to one social glass. The faces have been blurred to protect the innocent.
Either way, a nice coda to the end of the academic year, as the above title’s eighth-century manuscript postscript line-inspired suggests:

The job is done, I think;
For Christ’s sake, give me a drink.

I should do a post on this excellent Georgian structure, the Sydney Hotel by Thomas Baldwin, now the museum redesigned and added to during all periods. The last changes occured early in the 20th C and now there is a controversial modern extension that has planning consent.
070601.002.SO.Bath
A great skit from December 2006 by Rico Galliano of Marketplace from American Public Media (and Public Radio International)

KAI RYSDAAL, HOST:
Cross fragile office politics with the social minefield of a party, douse liberally with spiked eggnog, and voila: [you have] a recipe for disaster, otherwise known as the annual holiday office party.
But not to worry, the Marketplace Players are here to help with an educational primer they call:
[cue Fifties-style music and Fifties-styled Announcer:] “Holiday Party Dos and Don’ts”

ANNOUNCER:
Meet Herbert.

HERBERT:
Hi.

ANNOUNCER:
My, Herbert, don’t you look spiffy!

HERBERT:
I’m off to the Office Christmas Party!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
Ow! You blasted my ears with a foghorn!

ANNOUNCER:
That’s because you just made a big faux pas, Herbert. Never call it a Christmas party; call it a holiday party.

HERBERT:
You mean to show respect to all coworkers of different cultures and ethnic backgrounds?

ANNOUNCER:
You got it!

[At party, sound of background chattering.]
ANNOUNCER:
Boy, this is a swell party but hey, where are you headed?

HERBERT:
The open bar!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
Oww. What now?!

ANNOUNCER:
You’re not drinking on my watch, Herbert. Not at an office holiday party.

HERBERT:
…But…isn’t that the point?

ANNOUNCER:
No, the point is to put in an appearance and leave with your job and reputation intact.

HERBERT:
That’s true. Can I have just one?

ANNOUNCER:
Well alright.

HERBERT:
Bartender, give me a scotch straight up—make it a double!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
…I mean a single.

ANNOUNCER:
That-a-boy. Wow, Herbert, there’s that coworker you’re keen on.

HERBERT:
You’re right! Hey, hot mamma!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
[angrily] Look, you have no right meddling in my love life.

ANNOUNCER:
It’s your career I’m worried about, Herbert. Now that coworker thinks you’re creepy. If you must flirt, be a gentleman.

HERBERT:
OK, I’ll try with someone else.

ANNOUNCER:
Herbert…

HERBERT:
Excuse me, but…that’s a lovely dress.

LADY:
Why thank you.

HERBERT:
I haven’t seen you around the office. If I had, I would have asked you to lunch.

LADY:
Oooh-la-la.

HERBERT:
What do you do for us?

LADY:
I’m your boss’ wife! [cackles]
[FOGHORN!]

ANNOUNCER:
I tried to warn you, Herbert. Better cut your losses, circulate a little and then high-tail it home.

HERBERT:
OK, right after I finish this shrimp cocktail.
[FOGHORN!] HERBERT: [muffled curse]

ANNOUNCER:
Oops. You got cocktail sauce all over your shirt.

HERBERT:
[angrily] Only after you blew that insane horn in my ear!

ANNOUNCER:
That sauce makes it look like you got stabbed. Leave. Pronto.

HERBERT:
This is the least…fun…Christmas….
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
…h…holiday…party…ever.

ANNOUNCER:
Oh silly Herbert, when will you learn: It’s not a party, it’s work!

« Previous PageNext Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.