070727.Walcot, Conservation Students Graduating in a Complete Restoration? No Thanks.

July 27, 2007 at 4:11 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Restoration, somerset, Walcot | 4 Comments

I was originally to be graduating here in the Assembly Rooms, once one of Bath’s Georgian wonders but sadly destroyed in the Second World War. The rooms were rebuilt. They appear historic, but it is not actually a historic building. It is still listed, of course, and it still contains the shell of the rooms — but it’s a complete restoration. Most students graduate during the summer here and in Bath Abbey. Now that is a place to graduate in – and I want in! So I’m happily postponing graduation and trading up into the better space.
061029.041.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Assembly Rms

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070710.Walcot, Cavendish Place

July 10, 2007 at 2:40 AM | Posted in Architecture, Walcot | Leave a comment

061015.03.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Cavendish Road.d Pinch the Elder.1808-16

Slightly different from yesterday’s Cavendish Crescent by Pinch the Elder, today Bath Daily Photo brings you…

Cavendish Place by Pinch the Elder, .1808-16

CAvendish Place 061015.07.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Cavendish Road.d Pinch the Elder.1808-16 070314.177.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

posted by JosyC

070709.Walcot, Cavendish Crescent

July 9, 2007 at 4:37 AM | Posted in Architecture, Crescents, somerset, Walcot, Window | 2 Comments

061015.09.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Cavendish Crescent.1815-30.d.Pinch the Elder

When?! When will the crescents end?!??

When James says they do. Oy gevalt.

Cavendish Crescent: “a short, late crescent of 1815-30, by Pinch the Elder, for William Broom, a speculating builder, who in 1815 was living at No. 3 and who was bankrupt in 1825. Following the contours along the edge of the High Common, the eleven houses are four storyed m three windows wide, with no central feature and somewhat austere except for cornices on long consoles over the middle first-floor windows. Sir William Holburne lived at No. 1, 1829, where he houses his collection.” –Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 167.

posted by JosyC

070706.Bath, Somerset Place

July 6, 2007 at 6:49 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Crescents, doorways, Light and Shadow, somerset, Walcot | 4 Comments

061015.12.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Somerset Place. d John Eveleigh.1790

“Bath’s most unusual crescent of sixteen houses above Cavendish Crescent. Started by John Eveleigh in 1790, it was abandoned for financial reason and only resumed c 1820; the west wing has only five houses though cellars were built for two more. The central symmetrical pair, Nos. 10-11, dominate, with a big six-bay broken segmental pediment. The tympanum is carved with paterae and swags caught up by pegs, and reverse curves to the tympanum in the broken section meet to form a pedestal with a vase finial. The first floor has a central arched niche with an open pediment. The paired doors have Gibbs surrounds and icicle keystone masks and cornices on consoles that terminate in carved leaves.

“These houses were built as a semi-detached pair; they step slightly forward, and are not curved in plan like the winds. The flanking houses are simpler, three storeys, three bays; the east wind descends downhill, managing the slope with a tilted platband and cornice. The doorcases are rusticated and have cornices on consoles, some with unusual acanthus leaf keystones. Nos. 5-7 and 10-13 were gutted by incendiaries in 1942 and rebuilt for student hostels by Hugh D. Roberts, 1950-1960s.” –Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 171. Elevation from Walter Ison’s Georgian Buildings of Bath (1980).

posted by JosyC
Somerset Place
061015.15.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Somerset Place. d John Eveleigh.1790

070705.Bath, King’s Circus

July 5, 2007 at 1:36 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Columns, Corinthian Order, Doric Order, Ionic Order, somerset, Walcot | 8 Comments

061029.042.Somset.Bath.Walcot.John Wood the Elder's Circus.1754-1758

Littered with Druidic and Masonic symbols, John Wood the Elder’s final masterpiece was the King’s Circus, built on Barton Fields outside the old city walls of Bath that enclosed the Bimbery. Here, uniform facades and rhythmic proportions in conjunction with classical principles of unerring symmetry were followed throughout the city.

070314.068.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

The orders are stacked, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, paying homage to the Coliseum, which is in fact what the structure aims to be…and inverted Coliseum. Naming it a circus denotes his lack of a classical education, as circuses were elliptical. Similarly, his theories on Druidic culture were equally wrong. Nevertheless, this first circus was copied throughout the world, and has been referred to as the model for all urban roundabouts.

070213.18.Somset.Bath.Bath At War 061029.059.Somset.Bath.25 Gay St.Jane Austen Centre.Watercolor by SH Grimm.1773 070314.193.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus 070314.192.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

posted by JosyC

070701.Walcot,THEME DAY: RED [Ball Express Zooming Over the Cleveland Bridge]

July 1, 2007 at 2:30 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Bridges, Doric Order, people, river, River Avon, somerset, Walcot | 9 Comments

07016.02.SO.Bath
Here’s the [or Grandpa’s] Red Ball Express going over H. Goodridge’s Cleveland Bridge, 1827! It has four Doric pavilions and is EU compliant; this thing can carry trucks! To prevent those heavy things from going off the edge and busting the historic cast iron railing, a fiber-mesh-futuristic-material-thingy was installed between the road and pedestrian path to bounce trucks back into the road if they drift.

Like this Model A (?), I’m off! I’m going to be gone for eleven days. I wish everyone a good July!

On this 1st of July, 96 cities are participating in the City Daily Photo theme day, “Red”.
To see red right around the world, click on the following links:

Bath, UK
Shanghai, ChinaMumbai, IndiaNew York City (NY), USAManila, PhilippinesAlbuquerque (NM), USAHamburg, GermanyStayton (OR), USALos Angeles (CA), USAHyde, UKOslo, NorwayBrookville (OH), USAMelbourne, AustraliaStavanger, NorwayBellefonte (PA), USABucaramanga (Santander), ColombiaJoplin (MO), USASingapore, SingaporeSelma (AL), USACleveland (OH), USAKuala Lumpur, MalaysiaChandler (AZ), USAStockholm, SwedenSeattle (WA), USABoston (MA), USAArradon, FranceEvry, FranceBaton Rouge (LA), USAMaple Ridge (BC), CanadaBoston (MA), USAGrenoble, Francehttp://www.blogger.com/Greenville (SC), USAHilo (HI), USANelson, New ZealandLa Antigua, GuatemalaBrisbane (QLD), AustraliaSingapore, SingaporeTel Aviv, IsraelHong Kong, ChinaSequim (WA), USAPaderborn, GermanySaarbrücken, GermanyRotterdam, NetherlandsTenerife, SpainKyoto, JapanTokyo, JapanSydney, AustraliaNaples (FL), USACologne (NRW), GermanyWassenaar (ZH), NetherlandsSaint Louis (MO), USACypress (TX), USAOcean Township (NJ), USAMainz, GermanyToruń, PolandMenton, FranceMonte Carlo, MonacoSingapore, SingaporeNorth Bay (ON), CanadaJakarta, IndonesiaMontréal (QC), CanadaTuzla, Bosnia and HerzegovinaMinneapolis (MN), USABaziège, FranceSan Diego (CA), USAPrague, Czech RepublicAmpang (Selangor), MalaysiaNew York (NY), USAKajang (Selangor), MalaysiaSharon (CT), USANewcastle (NSW), AustraliaPort Angeles (WA), USANottingham, UKVilligen, SwitzerlandChicago (IL), USATorquay, UKBrussels, BelgiumSan Diego (CA), USAMexico (DF), MexicoSaint Paul (MN), USACape Town, South AfricaParis, FranceSeoul, KoreaManila, PhilippinesMilano, ItalyChennai (Tamil Nadu), IndiaAustin (TX), USAChennai, IndiaMadrid, SpainSeoul, South KoreaWailea (HI), USAToronto (ON), CanadaAjaccio, FranceBuenos Aires, ArgentinaSilver Spring (MD), USAZurich, SwitzerlandSydney, Australia

070624.Walcot, Georgian Garden of No. 4 King’s Circus

June 24, 2007 at 2:23 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Conservation, Flowers, Gardens & Parks, Light and Shadow, Restoration, somerset, University of Bath, Walcot | 9 Comments

Was going to go down and take picture of the mayoral procession to St John’s Hospital today but because it was raining too hard, I only got halfway down the hill before deciding the rain might not be good for my camera. (I don’t have an umbrella.) So here’s a historic gardens and landscape post to christen the University of Bath’s new MSc in the Conservation of Historic Gardens and Landscape programme. I’ve retyped almost all the plaques to cut down on photos and I’ve included this rare image of a soil leveler.
070610.14.SO.Bath.Walcot.BrockSt.d.J.WoodII.1767-1770.GeorgianGrdn

Plaque I:

“In 1985 work began on recreating a Georgian-style garden. The existing garden was mainly Victorian, with a lawn and rockery, although a classical pavilion and a fish pond had been added in the 1920s.
070610.11.SO.Bath.Walcot.BrockSt.d.J.WoodII.1767-1770.GeorgianGrdn
No. 4 Circus was completed by autumn 1761. No illustrations or written descriptions of the original garden survive but excavations by Bath Archeological Trust, the first to be undertaken in an English town garden, revealed three garden plans pre-dating the 1920s alterations.

“There was no grass at all in the first garden here. Most of it was converted with gravel mixed with clay. Three flower beds were placed on the central axis with a large, round-ended bed across the bottom. The garden was self-contained, designed to be seen purely from the house.

“Around 1770 the paved paths were extended across the ends of the bottom bed to provide access, via a flight of steps, to the Gravel Walk, which linked the newly built Royal Crescent with Queen Square.070610.17.SO.Bath.Walcot.BrockSt.d.J.WoodII.1767-1770.GeorgianGrdn

“In 1836 a basement area was added to the back of the house and the surplus soil was spread over the garden. Above this protective clay layer, generally 18” thick, a new garden was created. For the next 150 years the garden saw little change until archaeologists removed the clay in 1986, and revealed the 18th century garden plan. The basement area was filled in and the garden restored to its layout of c. 1770.”

Plaque III:

“The archaeological excavations of 1985-6 revealed the design of the 18th century garden beneath soil spread over the area during work to the basement of the house in the 9th century. The original paths and beds were located but it was not possible to identify the species or location of the plants/ The garden has been reconstructed according to the plan of c. 1770 after alterations had been made to include the steps to Gravel Walk.

“The planting is based on a plan and list of plants prepared by Dr. John Harvey of The Garden History Society. It attempts to recreated the mood of a small town garden of the period as known from documentary sources. The trellis screen and honeysuckle pole are located in positions identified as post holes during the excavations although they are modern reconstruction. The seat is an exact copy of an 18th century original.
070610.15.SO.Bath.Walcot.BrockSt.d.J.WoodII.1767-1770.GeorgianGrdn
“Grass lawns were not easily maintained prior to the invention of mechanical lawn mower in 1832. Rolled gravel or ‘hoggin’ was used here instead. The borders are edged in Dwarfed Box, which together with the clipped topiary of Box, Yew and Holly reflect the lingering formality of earlier garden style. In the late 18th century the plants themselves were the main interest, not as today for their mass effect, but as individual botanic curiosities, often recently introduced by travelers to the New World and Indo-China. Fragrant flowers were favoured, double flowers preferred to single forms and variegated foliage was a novelty. The walls too were used to train fruit trees and climbing plants.

“The size of this garden had prevent the use of any large trees but there are small trees, shrubs, roses, hardy perennials and bulbs, with annuals planted in the central beds each Spring. All the plants used are known to have been available in the 18th century.

“The garden was completed in 1990 and is maintained by Bath Museums Service.

“Excavation of the garden was by Bath Archaeological Trust. We gratefully acknowledge the kind assistance of Bath Preservation Trust, Avon Gardens Trust, The Garden History Society and Dr. John Harvey, and the financial support of The Charles Robertson Trust, Mayor’s Honorary Guides and Bath City Council (Conservation Section)”

Contact: 

Tel: +44(0)1225 477752 Fax: +44(0)1225 444793

Georgian Garden Links: 

Georgian Gardens in Context, Garden Guides, “A Georgian Garden Reborn”by Yvonne Cuthbertson, Georgian Gardens by David C. Stewart,

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