080528.Weston, Victoria Bridge

May 28, 2008 at 11:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bridges, Light and Shadow, people, somerset, Towers | 7 Comments
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In the comments section for Gothic Cottage, Brenda and Robin both investigated the house’s occupants, and Robin in particular reported its connection with Victoria Bridge. Originally a brewer, James Dredge (1794-1863) designed Victoria Bridge near his brewery on Upper Bristol Road. Victoria was the first of nearly fifty bridges he would go on to construct as far away as India. Please read Robin’s comments at the link

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above. I appreciated the link so much, it forced me to come out of retirement.

This photo was taken quite a while ago. Sainsburys is now near the bridge, which has suffered several graffitti attacks. Also, while it may be well-proportioned, its quite diminutive in size (explained by the fact that this was a first bridge its designer built–so more of a test case) — evidenced by a teen in the photo climbing its cables and mounting one of its towers.

I’d never heard of Dredge before I read them in the comments section but I like the fact that a brewer was responsible for this piece of engineering. My own undergraduate school was founded by a very wealthy nineteenth-century brewer as one of the first colleges for female education. The first building erected was massive, intended to hold everything from dormitories and classrooms to offices, the library, kitchens, and a chapel. while it was designed by a prominent architect, the brewer-founder specified that he wanted the building to be fexible internally should female education prove to be a bust and he need to recoup his losses by adaptively reusing the college building as a massive brewery. The internal layout remains that the halls within the building are large enough to roll industrial-size kegs down. The size was justified to the ladies attending that it was wide enough for two hoop dress-wearing girls to pass each other with ease.

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071225.Happy Christmas

March 31, 2008 at 4:37 PM | Posted in Bath, Christmas, people, Towers | 5 Comments

Resize of 071212.001.SO.Bath

070725.Bath, I’ll Give You Rustication

July 25, 2007 at 9:17 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Conservation, doorways, Ionic Order, people, somerset | 9 Comments

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A long time ago in a land far away, when I was first learned the term rustication, my professor, already an angry and unhappy man, immediately explained to his rapt audience that every year the entire class would always confuse the word and write it as rustification. He said always — and without fail, and of course, that’s what sunk me. I still fight that f to this day.070718.56.SO.Bath

This was of course by design since he followed with a story about his friend who teaches at Harvard. I’m sure the person is more of an acquaintance since I doubt this man has any friends but apparently the Harvard architectural professor deliberately pronounced facade to his freshman audience as fakAde, and was greatly amused that the class followed his precedent into their later years in school.

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Back to the images. This facade of the Pump Room faces Stall Street. This stage was designed by Thomas Baldwin but the building was taken over in 1792 and redesigned and completed by John Palmer. This particular type of rustication present on each block is termed vermiculated, expressing the appearance of a worm-ridden block. The simple inversed-beak joints between the blocks are simply termed as chamfered. Note the Ionic order here along the famed colonnade.

070718.53.SO.BathThe street musician in the first photo performs on Stall Street when Abbey’s cloister square is occupied by another. There is some agreed upon schedule, as each act always ends five minutes to the hour and the musicians switch spots.

070722.Bath, Women’s Fashion

July 22, 2007 at 7:50 PM | Posted in Bath, people, somerset | 1 Comment

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This is from a while ago but this type of signage is everywhere. Today I saw someone holding this type of sign but reading the Harry Potter book.

Shoes 8.5-11 vs. John 3.16

070720.Bath, Scarred

July 21, 2007 at 3:09 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Bath, people, somerset, Supernatural | 8 Comments

For lack of a better title, it’s over now: phony Pottermania has bitten the dust — although it was a quite enthusiastic final showing. There was a good deal of hats present and some decent costumes. The line was incredibly long, it occupied most of Milsom St, but even still the drunks outnumbered the witches.
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Above: Drunks attack a Hippogriff
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Above: Beat the line and buy the book at full price. There’s a photo of JK Rowling on the back and it says “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” on the front but the cover art is strangely different.
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070717. 12/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai‚Äôs Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 17, 2007 at 2:15 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Horses, Overcast, people, somerset | 5 Comments

See the series so far!

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Below, Hokusai’s “Sumidagawa Sekiya no sato”
I could have fudged my photo a bit to make it match. I had been sitting on it for a while, building up a stockpile of horse photos. I could have covered up the blue van, perhaps added some shadow…. but I’m running out of time.

070715.Bathwick, The Legendary Pitstop of the Headless Horse and Man

July 15, 2007 at 8:11 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Bridges, Horses, Overcast, people, Pulteney Bridge, river, River Avon, somerset | 2 Comments

On Pultney Bridge.
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