070328.Bathwick, Star Cross’d Lovebirds

March 28, 2007 at 1:27 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Canals, Chisel Marks, Gardens & Parks, Peephole Views, Pigeon, Ruins, somerset | 8 Comments

070226.039.Somset.Bathwick.SydneyGrdns.Kennet&AvonCanal
[Sydney Gardens, Kennet and Avon Canal:.]
PIGEONO [Coming forward.]:
But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the East, and Pigeonietta is the sun!
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon
Who is already sick and pale with grief
That thou her maid art far more fair than she.
Be not her maid, since she is envious.
Her vestal livery is but sick and green,
And none but fools do wear it. Cast it off.
It is my lady! O, it is my love!
O, that she knew she were!
She speaks, yet she says nothing.
What of that? Her eye discourses; I will answer it.
I am too bold; ’tis not to me she speaks.
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night.
See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O, that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!

PIGEONIETTA :
Ay me!
PIGEONO:
She speaks.
O, speak again, bright angel, for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o’er my head,
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wond’ring eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy puffing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.

PIGEONIETTA:
O Pigeono, Pigeono! Wherefore art thou Pigeono?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

PIGEONO [Aside.]:
Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?
PIGEONIETTA:
Tis but thy name that is my enemy.
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face. O, be some other name
Belonging to a man.
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.
So Pigeono would, were he not Pigeono called,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Pigeono, doff thy name;
And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

PIGEONO:
I take thee at thy word.
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized;
Henceforth I never will be Pigeono.

PIGEONIETTA:
What man art thou, that, thus bescreened in night,
So stumblest on my counsel?

PIGEONO:
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am.
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself
Because it is an enemy to thee.
Had I it written, I would tear the word.

PIGEONIETTA:
My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue’s uttering, yet I know the sound.
Art thou not Pigeono, and a Montague?

PIGEONO:
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.
PIGEONIETTA:
How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

PIGEONO:
With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do, that dares love attempt.
Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.

PIGEONIETTA:
If they do see thee, they will murder thee.
PIGEONO:
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords! Look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against their enmity.

PIGEONIETTA:
I would not for the world they saw thee here.
PIGEONO:
I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes;
And but thou love me, let them find me here.
My life were better ended by their hate
Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

PIGEONIETTA:
By whose direction found’st thou out this place?
PIGEONO:
By Love, that first did prompt me to inquire.
He lent me council, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far
As that vast shore washed with the farthest sea,
I should adventure for such merchandise.

PIGEONIETTA:
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face;
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight.
Fain would I dwell on form–fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; but farewell compliment!
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say “Ay;”
And I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,
They say Jove laughs. O gentle Pigeono,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won,
I’ll frown and be perverse and say thee nay,
So thou wilt woo, but else, not for the world.
In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond,
And therefore thou mayst think my havior light;
But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more true
Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
I should have been more strange, I must confess,
But that thou overheard’st, ere I was ware,
My true love passion. Therefore pardon me,
And not impute this yielding to light love,
Which the dark night hath so discovered.

PIGEONO:
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops–

PIGEONIETTA:
O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circle orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

PIGEONO:
What shall I swear by?
PIGEONIETTA:
Do not swear at all;
Or if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self,
Which is the god of my idolatry,
And I’ll believe thee.

PIGEONO:
If my heart’s dear love–
PIGEONIETTA:
Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract tonight.
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden;
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say it lightens. Sweet, good night!
This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flow’r when next we meet.
Good night, good night! As sweet repose and rest
Come to thy heart as that within my breast!
PIGEONO:
O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?
PIGEONIETTA:
What satisfaction canst thou have to-night?
PIGEONO:
The exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine.
PIGEONIETTA:
I gave thee mine before thou didst request it:
and yet I would it were to give again.
PIGEONO:
Would’st thou withdraw it? for what purpose, love?
PIGEONIETTA:
But to be frank and give it thee again.
And yet I wish but for the thing I have.
My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.
I hear some noise within. Dear love, adieu!
[NURSE calls within.]
Anon, good nurse! Sweet Montague, be true.
Stay but a little, I will come again.
[Exit.]
PIGEONO:
O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard,
Being in night, all this is but a dream,
Too flattering-sweet to be substantial.
[Enter PIGEONIETTA again.]
PIGEONIETTA:
Three words, dear Pigeono, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honorable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,
By one that I’ll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.
[NURSE within.]
Madam!
PIGEONIETTA:
I come anon.–But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee–
[NURSE within.]
Madam!
PIGEONIETTA:
By and by I come.–
To cease thy strife and leave me to my grief
Tomorrow will I send.
PIGEONO:
So thrive my soul–
PIGEONIETTA:
A thousand times good night!
PIGEONO:
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light!
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books
But love from love, toward school with heavy looks
[Enter PIGEONIETTA again]
PIGEONIETTA:
Hist! Pigeono, hist! O for a falc’ner’s voice
To lure this tassel gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than
With repetition of “My Pigeono!”
PIGEONO:
How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears!
PIGEONIETTA:
Pigeono!
PIGEONO:
My sweet?
PIGEONIETTA:
What o’clock tomorrow
Shall I send to thee?

PIGEONO:
By the hour of nine.
PIGEONIETTA:
I will not fail. ‘Tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.
PIGEONO:
Let me stand here till thou remember it.
PIGEONIETTA:
I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Rememb’ring how I love thy company.
PIGEONO:
And I’ll still stay, to have thee still forget,
Forgetting any other home but this.
PIGEONIETTA:
‘Tis almost morning. I would have thee gone–
And yet no farther than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from his hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silken thread plucks it back again
So loving-jealous of his liberty.
PIGEONO:
I would I were thy bird.
PIGEONIETTA:
Sweet, so would I.
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
[Exit.]
PIGEONO
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest!

…[It doesn’t end well, so I’ll summarize: After hearing that PIGEONIETTA ate some bad bird seed, PIGEONO swallows a slice of white bread (the urban legends were true!). Then PIGEONIETTA, overcome by grief, flies into a window.]

>If you got down this far, congrats. I didn’t. But it’s now true, one picture tells 1,638 words.

070320.Bath, Shiny Emergency

March 20, 2007 at 1:14 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Architecture, Bath, Conservation, Crescents, Light and Shadow, Mansion, Peephole Views, people, Reflection, somerset, Supernatural | 4 Comments

Door handle of One Royal Crescent’s Drawing Room.

070308.037.Somset.Bath.RoyCrescent
exit_sign
One hundred beeswax candles lit equals the light given off by one 60-watt light bulb. Although it may be romantic to have that many candles lit

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in a room, it’s expensive and dangerous as well. Before the choice of electric or gas, candles or oil lamps of any kind were expensive and thus used sparingly. However, when they were inevitably used, precautions had to be taken in the event they burned down the house. Thus lamp and candle-era door handles, knobs, etc. were shiny to reflect the light of a carried candle or a raging inferno. If you needed to get out fast, you could find the exit. These were the equivalent of red-light EXIT sign boxes you see everywhere that are positioned throughout large spaces to aid in their two and a half minute evacuation. In Micahel Forsyth’s book “Buildings of Music,” (I don’t have it in front of me so don’t quote me) he figured out that theatres in particular burned down on average ever [number under 10, I think] years.

Most aesthetics of that long gone age reflected this necessity, and as gas and electric overtook commonplace lighting, so too did non-shiny, duller, more subtle colors overtake fashion. Today, we see shiny as somewhat tacky. (Although its use in architecture has been resurrected with the starchitects’, like Gehry’s, use of the aesthetically superficial to have their building stand out on glossy magazine covers.) Who wants an old mirror frame re-gilded to its shiny former like-new self? Basically, shiny doesn’t work in terms of modern aesthetics: think Liberace.

[Above: Liberace and “the World Famous Liberace Museum” in…Las Vegas. Below: The Great Lafayette. The story is paraphrased from JK GILLON’s article.]
lafayetteimage
Now, for a second, think of a different Liberace a long time ago in a place far far away: Edinburgh, Scotland, May 1911. One of the greatest and most popular magicians of Europe was the Great Lafayette, the highest paid entertainer on the continent at that time. His shows immediately sold out everywhere he went and featured numerous illusions, large-scale stage shows, a fantastic mechanical teddy bear, midgets galore, and exotic animals too!

The magician himself was somewhat of showstopper. As a “bachelor recluse,” he lived with his cross-bred terrier named Beauty, a gift from the great Harry Houdini. Beauty was certainly loved by its owner, who had a metal statue of the dog cast for his limo hood ornament. Lafayette bought the dog a pure gold diamond-studded collar, velvet cushions, a minature porcelain bathtub that was fitted on his private railcar. This magician lived for his dog.

But then, the unthinkable happened — Beauty died (curiously enough, of apoplexy caused by overfeeding – the same thing that French chefs do to the foie gras geese and also what probably killed by gerbil)! The magician could barely go on, he had his beloved dog embalmed and buried in what became his own plot in Peirshill Cementery, on a mound near the Portobello Road entrance.

This death of a loved one came four days into his two week show at the Empire Theatre, Edinburough. That Tuesday on the 9th of May, 1911, during the second evening performance, the shiny satin-costumed Lafayette was still grieving but had continued to perform and made it through almost the entirety of the show. All that remained was the finale, called “The Lion’s Bride.”

It started off easily enough, Lafayette charmed the audience by pulling out not a hare but an entire goat from the folds of his satin pants, quickly followed by the usual flocks of birds (extracted from a still shinier sequined-handkerchief). Then Lafayette vanished, then he reappeared, then he switched identities with his assistants, you know, the usual. But the act involved a staged “exotic” “Oriental” set, complete with tapestries, cushions, tents, curtains, carpets, etc. There was a caged African lion, fire-eaters, jugglers, acrobats – basically, everyone who was anyone. The whole stage seemed full of people who had previously appeared. A scantily-clad woman entered the lion-filled cage, which was then covered (to allow the sedate lion to be poked and roar), then the covering was lifted and suddenly the magician was in the cage! Fooled you, he’s the lion’s bride.

The crowd went wild, everyone always loved that act, it was a great way to end the show. Lafayette got out and bowed but in so doing he knocked over an “exotic” lamp, which quickly set the “exotic” curtains, carpets, and cushions alight.

What did the crowd think? Oh good! There’s more. Let’s stay seated. Soon the exotic blaze engulfed the footlights and edged to the stall seating. Stage hands, assistants, orchestra members and off-stage performers suddenly broke rank and started spilling out of the woodwork, where they were hidden. As the crowd got this sneak peak and learned a few of the magician’s secrets, the fire curtain quickly fell hiding the growing inferno and the audience jumped up and fled the theatre in about two and a half minutes.

Three hours later, the fire was under control but many of the orchestra and stage-hands didn’t make it out. Neither did midget Little Joe nor 15-year-old mechanical-teddy-bear-operator Alice Dale. But where was the magician — had he vanished to safety? A few survivors claimed he had escaped but returned to save his horse. Whatever the reasons, they shortly found his charred elaborately costumed body on stage – AND THEN THEY FOUND HIM AGAIN! The second severely burned body was found in a lower basement, and this one had his diamond rings – the ones he didn’t lend out to assistants.

Later that week, his ashes were interred in the resurrected and opened casket of Beauty, in a funeral described as “one of the most extraordinary interments of modern times.” Houdini didn’t make it to the funeral but he sent flowers, a floral arrangement shaped like Beauty.

Subsequently, theatres and large arenas have to be evacuated in under two and a half minutes. Cathedral-ceiling spaces can take longer but low-ceiling spaces should be evacuated much faster.

060218.Bathampton Down, A View to a Killing

February 18, 2007 at 12:00 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Castles, Chisel Marks, Claverton Down, doorways, Gardens & Parks, Light and Shadow, Mansion, Monuments and Memorials, Overcast, Peephole Views, Preservation, Restoration, Ruins, somerset, Towers, towns, Trees, University of Bath | 9 Comments

Walked by this two days ago after I picked up a package from the mailroom. It’s surrounded by the University of Bath‘s campus but is still somewhat difficult to reach. This is more of an excuse since I’ve never posted a shot of it and it’s a five minutes walk away from my house.
Copy of 070216.18.Somset.Bath.ClavertonDown.ShamCastle.d.RichardJones1762
Born in Cornwall, Ralph Allen (1693 – June 29, 1764), transferred from a post office there at age 17 to one in Bath. Two years later in 1712, he became the Post Master of the city. He shortly reorganized the entire postal service and became very wealthy doing so. Surprisingly, however, he saved his money and refused to invest in the quarries that surrounded Bath (and that he would become famous from) until the completion of the Kennet and Avon Canal, which allowed stone to be shipped to the Thames.

Shortly, He owned nearly all of Combe Down, creating a cart rail-track that took the stones down the hill from the quarries to the canal warf in Bath’s Dolmeads section where it would be shipped out. He was also able to keep costs down by paying his workers less. This was not necessarily cruel since he, unlike most other quarry employers, employed year-round, and had John Wood the Elder build model terrace housing for them in 1729.

In addition to these organized and economical applications to selling stone, he promoted the creamy-colored stone through his own constructions, such as this Sham Castle (1767), his Palladian Mansion of Prior Park (1742) with its Palladian Bridge, and in supplying it for free for prominent public buildings such as the General Hospital (1738-1742). To introduce stone to new markets, such as lucrative London, he sold it at a discount with guarantees that he would personally cover the cost of replacing the stone if it failed. Unfortunately, it often did and London’s smoggy environment frequently caused him to empty his pockets.

He died at age 71 and is buried in a mausoleum in Claverton (down the opposite slope from Bath of the Claverton Down hill). The old rail line that went from his quarries, past his mansion, and down to his warf is now Ralph Allen Drive, as well as one of the city’s secondary schools. A statue for the Lower Assembly Rooms was also carved in his honor (not sure where the statue is since the structure was demolished), paid for by the City of Bath Corporation.
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The “Sham Castle” was built by Allen’s Clerk of Works Richard Jones (the same person who completed John Wood the Elder’s designs for Prior Park after the latter’s dismissal) in 1762 as an eye-catcher for Allen’s town house mansion in Bath proper. That house, which is now hemmed in with other buildings, faces this hill (it was probably designed by John Wood the Elder, although his account of its design is cryptic.) In many ways, this castle is the equivalent of the Palladian Bridge on Allen’s Prior Park Estate. It can still be seen from the city when lit up at night (although it is very very small). Jones claimed the design for the façade structure was his, but Sanderson Miller had been approached to design it seven years earlier and Jones has a record for accepting credit for designs that he merely supervised (Prior Park). The structure replaced “Antsey’s Lodge.”
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Copy of 070216.04.Somset.Bath.ClavertonDown.ShamCastle.d.RichardJones1762
Copy of 070216.03.Somset.Bath.ClavertonDown.ShamCastle.d.RichardJones1762

Tune in tomorrow for more of Ralph Allen Week at Bath Daily Photo.

070214.Bath, Parade Garden Terrace Conserved with Lime Mortar and Many New Pieces

February 14, 2007 at 12:00 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Conservation, Gardens & Parks, Ladders, Overcast, Peephole Views, people, Preservation, Restoration, Sculpture, somerset | 4 Comments

070213.01.Somset.Bath.Parade Terrace Walk
-(Above:) Man applying lime mortar and then sponging away excess-
070213.02.Somset.Bath.Parade Terrace Walk070213.03.Somset.Bath.Parade Terrace Walk
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I came across this masonry “conservation” occuring yesterday along the west terrace of the Parade Gardens. Old worn out pieces were sawed and chiseled out and newly carved pieces were carted in and pounded into place with a hard lime mortar. Some of the pieces removed and completely replaced, however, looked to be in decent condition. And truth be told, I’ve passed this spot hundreds of times and never once thought that anything here on the railings needed fixing (–the retaining walls around the garden are another matter, which don’t seem to be addressed.) I think the English should be proud of their conservation efforts, which are much more thorough than anywhere else that I’ve ever seen, but this thoroughness is somewhat excessive. I don’t think its the high cost that proves them prohibitive in other places but the justification of such efforts to mend a chip here and there for a slightly worn public balustrade.
070213.07.Somset.Bath.Parade Terrace Walk070213.06.Somset.Bath.Parade Terrace Walk
I’m not entirely sure when this railing dates from. I believe it’s part of the early 20th century addition. I’ll figure that out later. The design, I believe, is a continuation of John Wood the Elder’s North Parade terrace balustrade and design for “St James’ Triangle,” which was most of the current Parade Gardens (See Wood’s “A Plan of the New Buildings of the South East Corner of Bath”). The bowls are replacements for where he had placed obelisks (see last image–N Parade).
Copy of ISON 135
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(The plan came from John Wood the Elder’s “Essays Towards a Description of Bath,” 1749. And the blurry N Parade aquatint is courtesy of the Bath Reference Library.)

070205.Bath, Avian Voyeurism

February 5, 2007 at 1:25 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Columns, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Peephole Views, people, Sculpture, siblings, somerset | 11 Comments

061024.045.Somset.Bath
Numerous Georgian guide books boast of the Cross Bath’s classical origin and namesake resulting from the land’s historical conversion. Although the bath’s hotspring is a natural feature that could easily have been utilized in classical times, the earliest social location feature that distinguishes the bath is the twelfth century Hospital of St. John the Baptist. Cross Bath historian Jean Manco asserts that the hospital’s location suggests that the medieval Cross Bath was either founded with or predated the hospital but that the latter’s location was determined to make use of the hotsprings. The Cross Baths underwent numerous reconstructions and enlargements, before first attaining fashionable primacy in 1663 after the Charles II’s consort, Catherine, sought privacy to bathe in the high-walled hotsprings in an attempt to cure her infertility.
As stated in Saturday’s post in the “Miracle of Miracles” section, the next queen, Mary of Modena’s successful pregnancy attempts at the bath in 1688 and the subsequently embarrassing Melfort’s Cross. This last Cross of the Cross Bath was demolished bit by bit for nearly a hundred years, until it was completely removed in 1783, the year that Bath’s City Architect, Thomas Baldwin, submitted plans for the new Cross Bath. Redesigned by Baldwin in 1784, the isolation of this fashionable attraction had been one of the main motivations in the Bimbery’s (the Lower Town of Bath City Centre) redevelopment but the resulting neo-classical structure with a baroque north façade (now east do to reconstruction) with four columns was ill fitted in terms of its orientation and orders to its architect’s completed area redevelopment.

cross bath1

When efforts to rectify the Cross Bath with its surroundings in 1797 led by Baldwin’s successor John Palmer, Bath’s 1793 financial crisis had closed the chapter on ambitious redevelopment projects. Palmer’s redesign continued the structure’s long history of altercation and recycling by saving money by dismantling Baldwin’s baroque north façade and reassembling it to face east (toward Stall Street through Bath Street). Omitting Baldwin’s rusticated base, and adding a central chimney with an “ornamental feature with the vase in relied, balanced by ram’s head vases on either side,” Palmer then had Baldwin’s Corinthian capitals and other decorative details matched to fill the new north and south porticoes.
George Phillips Manner’s 1829-1830 alteration of the Cross Bath enlarged the apse into a vestibule and dressing rooms by filling in the detached colonnade, matching the three-fourth Corinthian columns with those of Baldwin’s (present) east façade, and subsequently reduced the presence of Wood’s doorway so that it could only be seen on the diagonal. A 1903 restoration removed the extensions and returned to Palmer’s original north façade design with detached columns, reinstating that design’s relationship with Wood’s doorway.
Between 1999 and 2003, Nicholas Grimshaw and Partners with conservation architects Donald Insall Associates completed a final restoration. The created the funky cantilevered elliptical lead roof, heated pool, and connection to their main project: the New Royal Baths (opened to the public in 2006.) The roof’s shape derives from Baldwin’s supposed original plan for the pump room attached to the baths. The bath beneath is the same size in plan as the roof but pushed to the south.

Facts and plans come from Jean Manco, “The Cross Bath.” In Bath History, ed. Simon Hunt (Gloucester: Alan Sutton Publishing Limited, 1988. 2: 49-84) and text in quotes come from page 74.

070201.Bath, CHEAPSKATES!

February 1, 2007 at 12:01 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Chisel Marks, Gardens & Parks, Overcast, Peephole Views, people, river, River Avon, somerset, stairs | 9 Comments

061125.03.Somset.Bath.GrandParade.Watching the Sat Game.accross Avon

The nerve of people watching football (soccer) for free from across the River Avon when they could just as easily cross nearby Pulteney Bridge and walk into the stadium for free! This is an unusually packed shot of the recreational grounds in Bathwick, which clearly demonstrates Bath propper’s higher ground. The recreational grounds were originally to be incorporated into housing as part of Bathwick New Town. However, the start of the Napoleonic Wars and an embargo led to local banks going bust in 1793, which put an end to all development in the city. The recreational grounds would have been built up like bordering Great Pulteney Street (one of the only areas of the development constructed), since it is on a flood-plane.

070125.Wells, Confrontational Battlements

January 25, 2007 at 12:12 AM | Posted in Architecture, Castles, Chisel Marks, Light and Shadow, Peephole Views, somerset, Wells | 3 Comments

060924.100.UK.Wells.Cathedral

< You are SUCH a murderhole.

> Chut UP, slit!

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