080528.Weston, Victoria Bridge

May 28, 2008 at 11:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bridges, Light and Shadow, people, somerset, Towers | 7 Comments
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In the comments section for Gothic Cottage, Brenda and Robin both investigated the house’s occupants, and Robin in particular reported its connection with Victoria Bridge. Originally a brewer, James Dredge (1794-1863) designed Victoria Bridge near his brewery on Upper Bristol Road. Victoria was the first of nearly fifty bridges he would go on to construct as far away as India. Please read Robin’s comments at the link

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above. I appreciated the link so much, it forced me to come out of retirement.

This photo was taken quite a while ago. Sainsburys is now near the bridge, which has suffered several graffitti attacks. Also, while it may be well-proportioned, its quite diminutive in size (explained by the fact that this was a first bridge its designer built–so more of a test case) — evidenced by a teen in the photo climbing its cables and mounting one of its towers.

I’d never heard of Dredge before I read them in the comments section but I like the fact that a brewer was responsible for this piece of engineering. My own undergraduate school was founded by a very wealthy nineteenth-century brewer as one of the first colleges for female education. The first building erected was massive, intended to hold everything from dormitories and classrooms to offices, the library, kitchens, and a chapel. while it was designed by a prominent architect, the brewer-founder specified that he wanted the building to be fexible internally should female education prove to be a bust and he need to recoup his losses by adaptively reusing the college building as a massive brewery. The internal layout remains that the halls within the building are large enough to roll industrial-size kegs down. The size was justified to the ladies attending that it was wide enough for two hoop dress-wearing girls to pass each other with ease.

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070729.Bathwick, Goodbye for Now…

July 29, 2007 at 1:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Bathwick, Cathedrals and churches, cumulus clouds, Light and Shadow, Mansion, somerset, Towers | 14 Comments

I’ve been running the site for over 300 days and I’ve lived here for twelve months but I’m leaving today for a new job. It’s exciting — my first time in Ireland. I’ll return in a few months and update this periodically so for everyone who I didn’t say goodbye to (which is more or less everyone) goodbye…
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070727.Walcot, Conservation Students Graduating in a Complete Restoration? No Thanks.

July 27, 2007 at 4:11 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Restoration, somerset, Walcot | 4 Comments

I was originally to be graduating here in the Assembly Rooms, once one of Bath’s Georgian wonders but sadly destroyed in the Second World War. The rooms were rebuilt. They appear historic, but it is not actually a historic building. It is still listed, of course, and it still contains the shell of the rooms — but it’s a complete restoration. Most students graduate during the summer here and in Bath Abbey. Now that is a place to graduate in – and I want in! So I’m happily postponing graduation and trading up into the better space.
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070726.Bath, View from North Parade Bridge

July 26, 2007 at 9:30 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Bridges, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

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Prominent view of Bath Abbey, the Empire Hotel, St Michael’s Without, and Pulteney Bridge

070723.Combe Down, Tunnel Vision

July 23, 2007 at 2:04 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bridges, Combe Down, Light and Shadow, somerset | 5 Comments

There are great little moments in Bath and the area. Here, through this tunnel of foliage, lies a sunlight-lit house at the end. When you get there and gaze out where its windows overlook, you find that you’re at the base of Prior Park and can see the famous Paladian bridge there. Isn’t that amazing?
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Over the hedge: 1, 2.

070720.Combe Down, Weathered Timber Throughout the Day

July 20, 2007 at 2:36 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Combe Down, countryside, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

070629.071.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
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070629.076.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.070.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.072.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.073.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage One of Bath’s joys is its incredible stone. Containing just a bit of iron, the stone has a warm creamy color that positively glows at sunrise and sunset. Like Italy, almost the entire place is constructed with the same material, so the color surrounds the viewer and makes the whole rigorously ordered, individualistic, and finely executed pieces of architecture feel as if all part of one piece. As such, Bath is a World Heritage site, rightfully treated as one entity but this singularity on the wealth of Georgian architecture and its unique building material discriminates against the other materials of bath, such as the brick Gothic Cottage of Sion Hill and this engaging more or less modern timber structure, just off Prior Park. Rebel materials in this Bath stone town have enjoyed brief periods of popularity. For instance, when before the Kennet and Avon canal, brick (imported) was far more expensive than finely cut ashlar Bath stone! There is at least one example of a Bath stone house with a one brick thick front facade. I enjoy this house for the same reason, mainly its surrounding Bath stone wall, which you find throughout the city and countryside here. Besides, it has a great view!

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070718. 13/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai‚Äôs Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 18, 2007 at 2:17 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, cumulus clouds, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

See the series so far!

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Perhaps you’ve picked up that this photo was lifted from the archives to compare with Hokusai’s “Soshu Enoshima.”

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