070729.Bathwick, Goodbye for Now…

July 29, 2007 at 1:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Bathwick, Cathedrals and churches, cumulus clouds, Light and Shadow, Mansion, somerset, Towers | 14 Comments

I’ve been running the site for over 300 days and I’ve lived here for twelve months but I’m leaving today for a new job. It’s exciting — my first time in Ireland. I’ll return in a few months and update this periodically so for everyone who I didn’t say goodbye to (which is more or less everyone) goodbye…
070627.19.SO.Bathwick

070718. 13/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai’s Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 18, 2007 at 2:17 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, cumulus clouds, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

See the series so far!

061024.019.Somset.Bath.Bathwick.Iconic BathFHH125_c
Perhaps you’ve picked up that this photo was lifted from the archives to compare with Hokusai’s “Soshu Enoshima.”

070618.Walcot, History of St. Swithin’s

June 18, 2007 at 12:52 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, Conservation, cumulus clouds, Ionic Order, Jane Austen, Light and Shadow, somerset, Towers, Walcot | 17 Comments

060924.11.Somset.Bath.Walcot St.St Swithins.d John Palmer.1777-90

The former warden of the church, Des Brown and his wife Maureen, wrote the nice historical pamphlet “Parish Church of St. Swithin: Walcot, Bath,” which is available for free if you visit the church. It’s open for Sunday services at 6:30pm and for walk in visits on Wednesday. It also has a youth service at 8pm on the second Sunday of each month. The main part of the church has just been reopened and the crypt space should be ready by September.

Currently, the Parish of Walcot at St. Swithin’s is absorbing the congregation of St. Andrew’s.

History of the St. Swithin’s, Walcot (from the Brown pamphlet)–07013.17.SO.Bath07013.18.SO.Bath

1. Possibly a site of worship since the Roman times since Walcot and not Bath was the centre of the Roman settlement (Bath was the site of the hot springs and temples only)
2. The first St. Swithin’s Church was constructed on this site in 971, one of fifty churches around England dedicated to the Bishop of Winchester (852-862). The foundations for this church are still present in the crypt. It was very small (16 x 21 feet.)
3. Second church is constructed at some point during the medieval era while Walcot is still a hamlet far outside Bath’s city walls, but is included in the city when the boundary is extended in 1590.
4. 1739 Medieval church damaged during gales and a new church, designed by Churchwarden Robert Smith, was built in 1742. Smith was chosen after designed by John Wood the Elder were rejected! The foundations of this church are also visible in the crypt and the original size is marked by the inner columns. Nave was 40 x 30 feet and chancel was 14 by 20 feet.

5. Future City Architect and City Surveyor (and parishioner) John Palmer demolished the thirty-year-old church for a larger structure, utilizing the former structure’s foundation for the interior column supports. The new church was consecrated in 1777. Built to the same length as the Smith church but wider.

6. It was extended eastward (where it needed to shore up a steep slope) in 1788.
07013.22.SO.Bath

7. A spire was added in 1790.

8. It was THE parish church of Georgian Bath, and the only remaining one of the city.061002.101.Somset.Bath.St Swithins.d John Palmer.1777-90
9. During the nineteenth century, the parish was one of the largest parishes in the country, so it was broken up with the construction of three new parish churches: Holy Trinity (demolished in 1955(?) parish moved), St. Stephen’s (Lansdown Hill), and St. Saviour’s (Larkhall, yet to be posted).
10. An oriel window was inserted into the east end in 1841.
11. East end pews were removed for choir stalls (removed in 1985) in 1871 under the influence of the Evangelical Revival.
07013.21.SO.Bath
12. A landslide destroyed 175 horses opposite the church in 1881 (Bath is a very hilly place and has the most landslides in the country), thus creating Hedgemead Park. The damaged church was strengthened by tie-bars, and the galleries were cut back from the columns and new supports inserted (except where the organ was. See below.)
07013.35.SO.Bath
13. 1942: During the Blitz, the east window was shattered by bombing and a new window replaced it in 1958 (the new window is favored over the old).07013.27.SO.Bath
14. 1951 Communion table introduced
15. 2006-2007 a major refurbishment re-ordered the church interior and the crypt.

Notable parish Members

Rev. George Austen, (Jane Austen’s father)
Fanny Burney, novelist
Comte d’Arblay (Fanny’s husband)
William Wilberforce
John Palmer, City Architect and City Surveyor
Sir Edward Berry (fought with Nelson at Trafalgar)

070419.Claverton Down, Fight Fire with Fire

April 19, 2007 at 8:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Claverton Down, countryside, cumulus clouds, Ruins, somerset, University of Bath, Waterfront | 5 Comments

060923.03.Somset.ClavertonDown.Bath.University.University.DuckPond
Currently, I am experiencing some internet issues but I leave you with the most scenic view possible (selectively cropped) on this ugly little campus. Commonly called the University of Bath’s Duck Pond, it is not in fact a pond, nor even a lake. It’s not even an artificial pond or lake. It’s technically a fire-fighting reserve reservoir (for this concrete, steel and glass hilltop world). This is not just a title. Half of the reservoir’s “beach” is composed of concrete slopes and intrusive pipes. Farther left, there’s even a random thingamajig sticking out of the ground nearby covered with the ruins of an ancient column base, reflecting no doubt on the Uni’s ‘excellent’ ranking for its architecture department. Fibreglass in construction, I would have preferred a giant four foot gnome with a T-Square.

070408.Bradford, EASTER

April 8, 2007 at 8:35 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bradford, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, countryside, cumulus clouds, Light and Shadow, somerset | 5 Comments

061021.153.Somset.Bath.Bradford.Landsdown Hill.Beckford's Tower

Lansdown Cemetery.

-posted by JosyC. I apologize for the lack of caption, but I couldn’t come up with something appropriately sincere.

070402.Bathwick, The Rare Perfect Day in the OK

April 2, 2007 at 2:30 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, cumulus clouds, Light and Shadow, Overcast, Reflection, River Avon, somerset | 3 Comments

070226.030.Somset.Bathwick.ClevelandHus

A beautifully reflective window of Cleveland House (c.1800) over the Kennet and Avon Canal,
Bathwick,
Bath,
Bath and Northeast Somerset,
Somerset,
England,
the Overcast Kingdom,
Europe,
Earth,
etc.

posted but not created by JC. This is the third time I’ve tried to post this, so if you see a double- or triple-post, I’m sorry, but I’m not fixing it.

070324.Claverton Down, The Sun Through Hail, Sleet and Snow

March 24, 2007 at 4:47 AM | Posted in Bath, Claverton Down, cumulus clouds, Flowers, somerset | 3 Comments

070319.2.SO.Bath.ClavertonDown.Hale
It was a practically a cloudless day when this black cloud rolled along and started shooting out hail (the white pebbles below). What can you do?
070319.1.SO.Bath.ClavertonDown.Hale

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