070314.Bath, No Tulips to Tiptoe Through Yet

March 14, 2007 at 2:26 AM | Posted in Bath, Bathampton, Bradford-on-Avon, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Claverton, Claverton Down, countryside, Flowers, Gardens & Parks, hippies, Light and Shadow, Overcast, somerset, towns, Trees, University of Bath, Wiltshire | 7 Comments

Considering it was the only reason people know “Tiny Tim,” statistically it’s no surprise that that was the last song he ever performed. Seriously, he suffered a heart attack while singing it at a Gala Benefit for the Woman’s Club of Minneapolis. I have a lot of flower photos I want to unload to prove to everyone that it’s spring. This has taken a lot more work than I thought it would. Maybe I’ll have more but if you don’t hear from me again, you, you dear audience are my Woman’s Club of Minneapolis.
Someone knowledgeable about flowers told me the following: “The larger dark blue/purple are primroses. The smaller blue are scilla, the very small white are wild cyclamen.” Someone less knowledgable told me if I ever go back in time that I shouldn’t step on anything. Photos presented chronologically with most recent on top.

Below: Claverton Down, Bathwick Hill Road wall with “I think (not sure) it’s creeping phlox — a particularly strong color. Usually creeping phlox…is pastel — pastel white, pink or lavender. This is a really strong color so it might be something else.” The second photo is the view from my window.
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Below: Claverton Down, University of Bath
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Below: Bath (Twerton?), High Commons, Commune Garden:
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Below: Bath (Twerton?), Royal Victoria Park’s Botanical Garden (5Mar07): (with the exception of the night shot in Claverton Down)
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Below: Bath, Royal Victoria Park (5Mar07):
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Below: Bathampton, St Nicholas’ Cementery back on the 26th of Feb.
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Below: Claverton, St Mary the Virgin’s Cemetery back on the 26th of Feb.
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Below: My first flower shot of spring(?) in Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts. back on the 30th of January!
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070311.Weston, All Saints Pevsner Architectural Church Chat

March 11, 2007 at 1:15 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Monuments and Memorials, Pevsner, somerset, Tabernacles, Weston | 9 Comments

070306.068.Somset.Bath.Weston.AllSaints.d.Pinch.1830-2
Summarized from All Saints’ Website:
An early church is mentioned by Pope Adrian IV in a 1156 Bull. Jordanus, the first vicar, arrives at Weston in 1297. In the 15th Century, “All Hallows” Church is built but is demolished in 1830 to create a larger space for a growing community with only its original tower surviving. The church bells were recast by Thomas Belbie at Chewstoke in 1739, and were repaired and retuned between 1952-1953.

The new church of “All Saints” was consecrated on June 2, 1832. It shares some similarities with Pinch’s other works at St. Mary the Virgin, Bathwick and St. Saviour, Larkhall, although both of those examples were newbuilds and are defined by tall western towers, whereas All Saints is more diminished. New seating with new transcepts and a chancel were added between 1880 and 1893, and new “clergy and choir vestries were added in 1909.”[1] The church furnishings and internal program have been remodeled several times since then and recently a restoration was undertaken of the tower. Near the tower door is a 19th century font, and on the West Gallery are displayed William and Mary’s royal coat of arms.

On the south aisle there is the St Alphege window, which “commemorates the famous saint whom tradition says was born in Weston (St Alphege became the Abbot of Bath Abbey and then Archbishop of Canterbury). Also depicted is Guthram, King of the Danes, submitting to King Alfred and accepting Christianity.” In the south transept, there is a “monument to Alderman Sherston dated 1641. He was Mayor of Bath in 1632. “In a niche in the north wall of the chancel is found the oldest monument in the church from the 12-13th century. This is a stone coffin lid that was found under the south porch during the rebuilding of the church in 1830.” Other monuments include a 1699 honoring John Harrington of Kelston, a monument to “Dr William Oliver (of biscuit fame) whose family owned Weston Manor for many years.”[1]

There are over 90 tablets in the churchyard and many more within the church with some going back to the 12th Century. The church kept excellent records which indicated that most of those buried here had no connection with the town but chose the spot for their final repose because it was an idyllically isolated community far from the smog and congestion of Bath. This popularity lasted for over 200 years. I’ll post more on this later but one includes Thomas Baldwin’s monument to Thomas Warr Attwood.
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There are over 90 tablets in the churchyard and many more within the church with some going back to the 12th Century. The church kept excellent records which indicated that most of those buried here had no connection with the town but chose the spot for their final repose because it was an idyllically isolated community far from the smog and congestion of Bath. This popularity lasted for over 200 years. I’ll post more on this later but one includes Thomas Baldwin’s monument to Thomas Warr Attwood.

“Other than the simple C15 Perp[endicular] w[est] tower, the church was rebuilt in 1830-2 by John Pinch the Younger. E Harbottle of Exeter added the chancel and transecpts in 1893m and Mowbray A. Green a memorial chapel in 1921. Nave and aisles. Tall lancet-like three-light windows with four-centred arches and Perp tracery. Battlemetns and pinnacles. Arcade of tall piers of Perp section carrying four-centred arches. The nave is broad and low with a rear gallery….” [2]
“Plate: Chalice and Cover 1572; Apostle Spoon 1614; Chalice and Paten 1692; Flagon 1739. ” [3]

1-2: All Saints, Weston Web site
3: Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 295.
4: Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: North Somerset and Bristol, (Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1958), 334.

070226.Monkton Combe, St. Michael’s Pevsner Architectural Church Chat

February 26, 2007 at 12:25 AM | Posted in Architecture, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Monkton Combe, Overcast, Pevsner, roofs, somerset, Towers, Trees | 6 Comments

070215.78.Somset.MonktonCombe.St Michaels
The church is a small structure, 50 feet in length and 16 feet in breadth, covered with tiles; at the west end in a little stone turret hangs two small bells. It is dedicated to St. Michael.” -John Collinson, History of Somerset, 1791.

The original structure in the 1924 area guide was considered to be an “ancient Norman” one, and the parish minutes of 1757 give a glimpse of the small church structure having a chancel with at least two pews in it. “About the beginning of the XIX century,, when this little old church, after long neglect, needed extensive repairs, the inhabitant instead of repairing it, pulled it down and out of its materials build a new church of about the same size, seating only 95 persons, but to their minds no doubt more comfortable. It was erected in 1814 and did not last long. The Rev. Francis Pocock, being appointed vicar of Monkton Combe in 1863, found this church in a dilapidated state, and…for the needs for the parish, and had the courage to undertake the entire rebuilding of the sacred edifice.”– D. Lee Pitcairn and Alfred Richardson, An Historical Guide to Monkton Combe, Combe Down and Claverton (Bath: F. Goodall Printer, 1924) 28-29.

It was first suggested that an aisle should be added to the edifice, but this, it was found, could not be done, and it was finally decided to raze the old structure and erect and entirely new building. Mr. C. E. Giles, of London, designer of St. John’s, Bathwick, was the architect, and the builder was Mr. S. G. Mitchell of this city [Bath]. The church was opened on Tuesday, July 4th…capable of seating 300 worshipers.” —Bath Chronicle, July 6, 1865.

St. Michael. 1865, by C. E. Giles, enlarged in 1886 (GR), rather terrible piece of architecture. Inside a Venetian later C16 painting attributed to Schiavone (on loan). –Plate. Chalice and Cover 1634; Spoon 1797.” – Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: North Somerset and Bristol, (Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1958), 229.
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Typically unforunate with Victorian churches and other structures is its Welsh Slate roof. If I may add something to this list of quotes it is that I agree with Pevsner here. This is why the people of Monkton Combe can’t have nice things….

070225.Claverton, Exit Ralph Allen, Pursued by Pyramidal Mausoleum

February 25, 2007 at 1:49 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Chisel Marks, Claverton, Conservation, doorways, Overcast, Restoration, somerset, Tabernacles, Towers, Trees | 11 Comments

BDP to the moon!

Copy of 070205.36.Somset.Claverton.St Mary the Virgin Parish.Churchyard.RalphAllenMausoleum
I’m not sure who designed this mausoleum for Ralph Allen and various other family members but this is where he lies. He did not have children so his estate went to distant relatives, which is why his house ended up belonging to a rich Roman Catholic cardinal and then became a Catholic school. This is in the small parish churchyard of St. Mary the Virgin in Claverton, which is below Claverton Down. Again, I don’t know why he was buried here in this town versus Combe Down or Bath proper, but true to his life, he used his death to advertise his life in stone. As you can see, the pyramid has required many tie rods over the years, the repair supports almost become a structure in themselves. (The structure was recently restored in 1965.)
Copy of 070205.39.Somset.Claverton.St Mary the Virgin Parish.Churchyard.RalphAllenMausoleum
Copy of 070205.40.Somset.Claverton.St Mary the Virgin Parish.Churchyard.RalphAllenMausoleum
Copy of 070205.38.Somset.Claverton.St Mary the Virgin Parish.Churchyard.RalphAllenMausoleum070213.30.Somset.Bath.Bath Before Beau Nash.Ralph Allen

070129.Wells, HELLOCATHEDRO

January 29, 2007 at 12:00 AM | Posted in Architecture, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Chisel Marks, Ruins, somerset, Towers, Wells | 5 Comments

What can say? Wells. Things are going to be lame until Friday, y’hear?
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070114.Bradford, The Tragic Treasury-4

January 14, 2007 at 12:00 AM | Posted in Angels, Architecture, Bradford, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Chisel Marks, Gardens & Parks, Monuments and Memorials, New York, Ruins, Sculpture, somerset | 8 Comments

This is the Cemetery near Beckford’s Tower on Lansdown Hill. I will be back to my usual attentiveness near the end of the month. Until then enjoy the songs from a Series of Unfortunate Events (samples can be found on iTunes). I’ll post more Phillip Jackson statues later.

UPDATE: Yesterday in New York was “No Pants Day” on the #6 Train (Bronx-Manhattan Eastside, etc Local) . It starts with one or two people getting onto the train without any pants on. Then at the next stop a few more, until finally over 130 pantsless individuals board the train to the shock of all on board. It’s been sponsored by Improv Everywhere, and my friends participated in it last year. Scroll to the third photogroup to see parts of some pictures.

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Gone, gone the girl in brocade
Gone the words we might have said
Howl, winds, beacuse she is dead
And gone, gone, gone

Were teary, teary eyes once bright?
Weary sighs the tune
Dreary, dreary falls the night
And eerie light of the moon

 

Gone, gone, my Beatrice
Gone the lips I longed to kiss
Into a black and bleak abyss
Gone, gone gone
(Chorus: Gone are the summers of croques and cribbage)
Were teary, teary eyes once bright?
(Gone, gone,)
Weary sighs the tune
(are the winters of)
Dreary, dreary fall the night
(snow,)
and eerie light of the moon
(sigh and secrets.)
Were teary, teary eyes once bright?
(Gone too.)
Weary sighs the tune
(silver springs, golden)
Dreary, dreary fall the night
(falls.)
and eerie light of the moon.

–“Dreary” by the Gothic Archies.
Hey, I won’t be checking this very often for a week or two but will get back to everyone after that.

070113.Wells, The Tragic Treasury-3

January 13, 2007 at 12:48 AM | Posted in Architecture, Castles, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Ruins, Sculpture, somerset, Supernatural, Wells | 16 Comments

Taken a long, long time ago. This is a Phillip Jackson statue group at Wells Bishop’s Palace Hall ruins.
060924.069.UK.Wells.Cathedral

The world is a very scary place, my dear.
It’s hurled and its twirled through outer space, I fear.
So many ways to lose your skin in it,
the number of ways to die is infinite.

 

The world is a very scary thing, I find.
It’s curled all my toes and it’s curling my mind.
When I was young my study was candies
but they attract tarantulas and bees.

 

Some people act as if there were nothing wrong,
due to the fact they haven’t heard this song.

The world is a very scary place to go
It’s whorled and it’s swirled with death like lace, you know
You may have found my views unorthodox
but now the wolf is at the door; it knocks.

–“The World is a Very Scary Place”by the Gothic Archies.

Hey, I won’t be checking this very often for a week or two but will get back to everyone after that.

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