070724.Bath, “Each Drop Fat With Purpose and Spite”

July 24, 2007 at 5:34 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Dogs, somerset, stairs | 3 Comments

07016.08.SO.Bath.ParadeGrdns“There is going to be a great flood, and all shall drown except you and yours, and the chosen animals.… I shall bring a flood that will wipe out the world. The whole thing was a bad mistake—except you, you I like.”
“Who are you?”
“I’m the creator of the universe.”

070717.7.SO.Bath.Walcot.GeorgeStreet“I was just talking with the Lord and you know what? He regrets having made his children too. He says it like this: ‘I will blot them out’”
“What does that even mean?”
“It means he’ll blot them out, smush ‘em into the ground like ladybugs. He’s going to flood the place and drown everyone with his tears of rage. And guess who he picked to spearhead the operation? That’s right, me. Also, you virginal dummies will have to get married so we can re-seed the Earth. Stop waxing the rimrod and clean your togas. Get out to work.”

070305.01.Somset.Bath.ClavertonDown.BathwickHillRd“From what Ham had heard about God, he was a lot like his father: tough, stubborn and prone to yell right into your face for no reason. To Ham, a flood wouldn’t have been out the question. And God would have chosen his father because his father felt just like he did: He hated his kids and was going to teach them the meaning of righteousness by killing them dead.”

“Is it right to listen to the voice in one’s nose? Maybe I am sick in the head. But if I am wrong that means the dummies are right. There is nothing left for me to do but persist.”

070704.262.Rome.Parrione.Cloister.SMariadellaPace.d.Cortona.1656-57Ham: “You know, we could empty out the alligator cage and make some more room for people. The world could do without alligators.”
Noah: “And disobey God, you dummy? …And you try reopening that door. Do you know what a pain that would be? No thanks.”
–Jonathan Goldstein

Left: Rome’s Cloister of S. Maria della Pace, designed by Cortona, 1656-57.

070723.Combe Down, Tunnel Vision

July 23, 2007 at 2:04 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bridges, Combe Down, Light and Shadow, somerset | 5 Comments

There are great little moments in Bath and the area. Here, through this tunnel of foliage, lies a sunlight-lit house at the end. When you get there and gaze out where its windows overlook, you find that you’re at the base of Prior Park and can see the famous Paladian bridge there. Isn’t that amazing?
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070629.083.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark
Over the hedge: 1, 2.

070720.Combe Down, Weathered Timber Throughout the Day

July 20, 2007 at 2:36 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Combe Down, countryside, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

070629.071.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
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070629.068.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.076.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.070.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage070629.072.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage
070629.073.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark.FishpondCottage One of Bath’s joys is its incredible stone. Containing just a bit of iron, the stone has a warm creamy color that positively glows at sunrise and sunset. Like Italy, almost the entire place is constructed with the same material, so the color surrounds the viewer and makes the whole rigorously ordered, individualistic, and finely executed pieces of architecture feel as if all part of one piece. As such, Bath is a World Heritage site, rightfully treated as one entity but this singularity on the wealth of Georgian architecture and its unique building material discriminates against the other materials of bath, such as the brick Gothic Cottage of Sion Hill and this engaging more or less modern timber structure, just off Prior Park. Rebel materials in this Bath stone town have enjoyed brief periods of popularity. For instance, when before the Kennet and Avon canal, brick (imported) was far more expensive than finely cut ashlar Bath stone! There is at least one example of a Bath stone house with a one brick thick front facade. I enjoy this house for the same reason, mainly its surrounding Bath stone wall, which you find throughout the city and countryside here. Besides, it has a great view!

070629.080.SO.Bath.CombeDown.PriorPark

070719.Bath, Are You There God? It’s Me, Dead Dean

July 19, 2007 at 9:16 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Columns, Corinthian Order, Monuments and Memorials, Sculpture, somerset, Tabernacles | 3 Comments

061002.164.Somset.Bath.Areyoutheregod.itsmedeadBishop Montagu
OK, actually dead Bishop Montague, d. 1618…

Monument designed and built by William Cure, mason. Nicholas Johnson was the carver.

070718. 13/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai’s Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 18, 2007 at 2:17 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, cumulus clouds, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Light and Shadow, somerset | 4 Comments

See the series so far!

061024.019.Somset.Bath.Bathwick.Iconic BathFHH125_c
Perhaps you’ve picked up that this photo was lifted from the archives to compare with Hokusai’s “Soshu Enoshima.”

070717. 12/46, Thirty-six Views of Bath Abbey. My tribute to Hokusai’s Fugaku Sanju Rokkei

July 17, 2007 at 2:15 AM | Posted in Actors in Period Costumes, Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Fugaku Sanju Rokkei, Hokusai, Horses, Overcast, people, somerset | 5 Comments

See the series so far!

07013.47.SO.Bath
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Below, Hokusai’s “Sumidagawa Sekiya no sato”
I could have fudged my photo a bit to make it match. I had been sitting on it for a while, building up a stockpile of horse photos. I could have covered up the blue van, perhaps added some shadow…. but I’m running out of time.

070716.Bathwick, Raby Place

July 16, 2007 at 12:39 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Chisel Marks, doorways, Light and Shadow, somerset | 5 Comments

070712.14.SO.Bath
Click here for whole block.
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Click here for a section without an added balcony but with all the restored/original sill windows (without Victorian plate glass).
On Bathwick Hill Road immediately after St. Mary the Virgin Church (and thus on the slope Bathwick Hill) lies Raby Place, designed by John Pinch the Elder between 1818-1825. The street name was originally Church Street (and remains so on my really outdated ordinance map). This series of eighteen two-bay terrace houses features Pinch’s famous design of a ramped cornice, similar to what can be found on a staircase banister and equally appropriate when one tries climbing this hill while carrying a litre of milk and some groceries. (Also see the same ramped cornice detailing on Cavendish Place, also by Pinch)

070712.11.SO.Bath
Click here to see the whole block.

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