070728.Bath, A Space Practically Designed to Graduate in — in Style

July 28, 2007 at 6:56 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Columns, Conservation, somerset, Stained Glass | 12 Comments

…And this is where I intend to graduate. I’m not a dropout, just editing the time in which I actually graduate. Soon I’ll be moving to Ireland so everyone enjoy these pics…
061002.152.Somset.Bath061002.126.Somset.Bath
061219.07.Somset.Bath.Abbey

070727.Walcot, Conservation Students Graduating in a Complete Restoration? No Thanks.

July 27, 2007 at 4:11 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Restoration, somerset, Walcot | 4 Comments

I was originally to be graduating here in the Assembly Rooms, once one of Bath’s Georgian wonders but sadly destroyed in the Second World War. The rooms were rebuilt. They appear historic, but it is not actually a historic building. It is still listed, of course, and it still contains the shell of the rooms — but it’s a complete restoration. Most students graduate during the summer here and in Bath Abbey. Now that is a place to graduate in – and I want in! So I’m happily postponing graduation and trading up into the better space.
061029.041.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Assembly Rms

070725.Bath, I’ll Give You Rustication

July 25, 2007 at 9:17 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Chisel Marks, Conservation, doorways, Ionic Order, people, somerset | 9 Comments

070718.62.SO.Bath
A long time ago in a land far away, when I was first learned the term rustication, my professor, already an angry and unhappy man, immediately explained to his rapt audience that every year the entire class would always confuse the word and write it as rustification. He said always — and without fail, and of course, that’s what sunk me. I still fight that f to this day.070718.56.SO.Bath

This was of course by design since he followed with a story about his friend who teaches at Harvard. I’m sure the person is more of an acquaintance since I doubt this man has any friends but apparently the Harvard architectural professor deliberately pronounced facade to his freshman audience as fakAde, and was greatly amused that the class followed his precedent into their later years in school.

070718.57.SO.Bath
Back to the images. This facade of the Pump Room faces Stall Street. This stage was designed by Thomas Baldwin but the building was taken over in 1792 and redesigned and completed by John Palmer. This particular type of rustication present on each block is termed vermiculated, expressing the appearance of a worm-ridden block. The simple inversed-beak joints between the blocks are simply termed as chamfered. Note the Ionic order here along the famed colonnade.

070718.53.SO.BathThe street musician in the first photo performs on Stall Street when Abbey’s cloister square is occupied by another. There is some agreed upon schedule, as each act always ends five minutes to the hour and the musicians switch spots.

070719.Bath, Are You There God? It’s Me, Dead Dean

July 19, 2007 at 9:16 PM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Columns, Corinthian Order, Monuments and Memorials, Sculpture, somerset, Tabernacles | 3 Comments

061002.164.Somset.Bath.Areyoutheregod.itsmedeadBishop Montagu
OK, actually dead Bishop Montague, d. 1618…

Monument designed and built by William Cure, mason. Nicholas Johnson was the carver.

070714.Bathwick, “Explicit hoc totum; Pro Christo da Mihi Potum”

July 14, 2007 at 12:11 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bathwick, Columns, Conservation, Corinthian Order, Light and Shadow, Mansion, Museums, people, somerset, University of Bath, Window | 2 Comments

From the archives now: last day of class party in front of the Holborne Museum. The first day of class also ended in the Holborne Museum for drinks. It was quite enjoyable but with cases of champaign, one must remember that the grades aren’t all in yet and to just keep it to one social glass. The faces have been blurred to protect the innocent.
Either way, a nice coda to the end of the academic year, as the above title’s eighth-century manuscript postscript line-inspired suggests:

The job is done, I think;
For Christ’s sake, give me a drink.

I should do a post on this excellent Georgian structure, the Sydney Hotel by Thomas Baldwin, now the museum redesigned and added to during all periods. The last changes occured early in the 20th C and now there is a controversial modern extension that has planning consent.
070601.002.SO.Bath
A great skit from December 2006 by Rico Galliano of Marketplace from American Public Media (and Public Radio International)

KAI RYSDAAL, HOST:
Cross fragile office politics with the social minefield of a party, douse liberally with spiked eggnog, and voila: [you have] a recipe for disaster, otherwise known as the annual holiday office party.
But not to worry, the Marketplace Players are here to help with an educational primer they call:
[cue Fifties-style music and Fifties-styled Announcer:] “Holiday Party Dos and Don’ts”

ANNOUNCER:
Meet Herbert.

HERBERT:
Hi.

ANNOUNCER:
My, Herbert, don’t you look spiffy!

HERBERT:
I’m off to the Office Christmas Party!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
Ow! You blasted my ears with a foghorn!

ANNOUNCER:
That’s because you just made a big faux pas, Herbert. Never call it a Christmas party; call it a holiday party.

HERBERT:
You mean to show respect to all coworkers of different cultures and ethnic backgrounds?

ANNOUNCER:
You got it!

[At party, sound of background chattering.]
ANNOUNCER:
Boy, this is a swell party but hey, where are you headed?

HERBERT:
The open bar!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
Oww. What now?!

ANNOUNCER:
You’re not drinking on my watch, Herbert. Not at an office holiday party.

HERBERT:
…But…isn’t that the point?

ANNOUNCER:
No, the point is to put in an appearance and leave with your job and reputation intact.

HERBERT:
That’s true. Can I have just one?

ANNOUNCER:
Well alright.

HERBERT:
Bartender, give me a scotch straight up—make it a double!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
…I mean a single.

ANNOUNCER:
That-a-boy. Wow, Herbert, there’s that coworker you’re keen on.

HERBERT:
You’re right! Hey, hot mamma!
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
[angrily] Look, you have no right meddling in my love life.

ANNOUNCER:
It’s your career I’m worried about, Herbert. Now that coworker thinks you’re creepy. If you must flirt, be a gentleman.

HERBERT:
OK, I’ll try with someone else.

ANNOUNCER:
Herbert…

HERBERT:
Excuse me, but…that’s a lovely dress.

LADY:
Why thank you.

HERBERT:
I haven’t seen you around the office. If I had, I would have asked you to lunch.

LADY:
Oooh-la-la.

HERBERT:
What do you do for us?

LADY:
I’m your boss’ wife! [cackles]
[FOGHORN!]

ANNOUNCER:
I tried to warn you, Herbert. Better cut your losses, circulate a little and then high-tail it home.

HERBERT:
OK, right after I finish this shrimp cocktail.
[FOGHORN!] HERBERT: [muffled curse]

ANNOUNCER:
Oops. You got cocktail sauce all over your shirt.

HERBERT:
[angrily] Only after you blew that insane horn in my ear!

ANNOUNCER:
That sauce makes it look like you got stabbed. Leave. Pronto.

HERBERT:
This is the least…fun…Christmas….
[FOGHORN!]

HERBERT:
…h…holiday…party…ever.

ANNOUNCER:
Oh silly Herbert, when will you learn: It’s not a party, it’s work!

070707.Bath, Lansdown Crescent

July 7, 2007 at 5:24 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Columns, Crescents, Ionic Order, somerset | 6 Comments

061015.23.Somset.Bath.Walcot.Lansdown Place E.d John Palmer.1789-93

070314.054.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

Lansdown Crescent No, this is NOT the same image as yesterday’s.070314.026.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

Immediately following Somerset House is Lansdown Crescent (1789-93): “a segment of twenty houses forming almost one-third of a circle, together with its convex flanking ranges, Lansdown Place West (No. 8 bombed and rebuilt by Mowbray Green, 1948 [Odd, I thought Mowbray Green died in 1946…perhaps rebuilt by zombie
Mowbray….]
) and Lansdown Place East (1792-5), which step up toward the main crescent.
“John Palmer designed them for Charles Spackman, coachbuilder and developer, and they were built by various speculating builders, some of whom were ruined by the bank failures of 1793. “The convex-concave-convex plan is remarkable. The convex winds are separated from the crescent centre by carriageways to the mews, but the effect is of one continuous form snaking along the hillside.” –Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 171-172.

“The convex-concave-convex plan is remarkable. The convex winds are separated from the crescent centre by carriageways to the mews, but the effect is of one continuous form snaking along the hillside. The architectural treatment of Lansdown Crecent is less superb that the earlier, more formal spaces in Bath. The pedimented four-pillaster Ionic centre with a wider space and a Venetian window in the middle is weak, as are the two bows at the ends, set just one bay in from the angle. But with its elevated position, its superb view over Bath, its fine overthrows and lamps (restored in the 1970s) and its patented stonework, magical at dusk, the crescent has unrivalled presence. Historically, the crescent in the winder would have floated, seemingly on clouds, above a pall of blue smoke from thousands of lodging-house chimneys. The details are simple (cost was crucial): ground-floor rustication, continuous first-floor sills (windows at the end houses extending down to the platband a Vitruvian scroll string course above the first floor, and an entablature with a plain frieze, modillioned cornice and balustraded parapet.)” –Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 171-172.

070314.196.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus.LansdownPlace070314.197.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus.LansdownCrescentposted by JosyC

070705.Bath, King’s Circus

July 5, 2007 at 1:36 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Columns, Corinthian Order, Doric Order, Ionic Order, somerset, Walcot | 8 Comments

061029.042.Somset.Bath.Walcot.John Wood the Elder's Circus.1754-1758

Littered with Druidic and Masonic symbols, John Wood the Elder’s final masterpiece was the King’s Circus, built on Barton Fields outside the old city walls of Bath that enclosed the Bimbery. Here, uniform facades and rhythmic proportions in conjunction with classical principles of unerring symmetry were followed throughout the city.

070314.068.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

The orders are stacked, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, paying homage to the Coliseum, which is in fact what the structure aims to be…and inverted Coliseum. Naming it a circus denotes his lack of a classical education, as circuses were elliptical. Similarly, his theories on Druidic culture were equally wrong. Nevertheless, this first circus was copied throughout the world, and has been referred to as the model for all urban roundabouts.

070213.18.Somset.Bath.Bath At War 061029.059.Somset.Bath.25 Gay St.Jane Austen Centre.Watercolor by SH Grimm.1773 070314.193.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus 070314.192.SO.Bath.BldgsofBathMus

posted by JosyC

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