070424.Lyncombe, Mall Is a Four Letter Word

April 24, 2007 at 4:45 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Bridges, Cathedrals and churches, Crescents, Gardens & Parks, somerset, Towers | 8 Comments

BDP to the moon!

061029.126.Somset.Bath.Lyncombe.Alexandria Park
bath_1846
The Etching is from 1846 and the photo was taken a few months ago from Alexandria Park on Lyncombe Hill, in the center you see Bath Abbey, behind which the spire belongs to St Michael’s Without. Its spire points to John Eveleigh’s Camden Crescent (1787-1794, not yet posted) in Walcot. To the lower left of the Abbey are the Roman Baths (not yet posted). The large building to the right of the Abbey is the Empire Hotel (not yet posted), and to the right of the hotel is Pulteney Bridge, leading the Bathwick New Town and Great Pulteney Street (also not yet posted). The tall spire and church at the extreme right is St John the Evangelist RC Church (it is not in the etching.) The area (known as the Ham) around St John’s is also empty, it was owned by the Roman Catholic Church and unwisely sold part and parcel. It now features the modern-looking police station. The street that defines this empty area is Manvers Street. Mr. Manvers had dreams of developing the area around the Bath Spa Train Station (bottom right, not yet posted) as the posh section of town but ran out of funds during a financial crisis. It still is relatively undeveloped, which is what prompted the redevelopment during the late 1960s. At the bottom left of the etching and picture, you can see houses and an ugly church. This is St Mark’s, now a community centre but built as one of three Commisioner’s Churches in Bath (the other two are Holy Trinity (demolished in late 1950s) and St Saviour, Larkhall (not yet posted)).
In front of the Bath Spa Train Station runs parallel Dorchester Street, and there to the left of the station stand (now stood) some 20th dairy buildings. Behind them, with its large parking lot space is the 1960s-70s Bath Coach Station, and behind that is the Ham Gardens Parking Garage. (These are obviously only in the photo). To the left of these modern structures is the dominating late 1960s, early 1970s Southgate Shopping Center with its Merchant’s Passage. Between the Southgate Mall and the Roman Baths along Stall Street is the modern Marks & Spencers Store, which demolished the listed buildings St James’ Church (1768-1769) and the National School (1816-1818).

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