061123.Westonbirt, Thanksgiving

November 23, 2006 at 8:07 PM | Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Orange.

 

Some dressings for the family table?

 

Orange.

 

061114.262.Glos.Westonbirt

 

Orange.

 

Onion Magazine

 

Orange.

 

“…13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, Orange,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32,33-Orange,
34, 44, 68, 27, 35. 42, 58,47, 63, 85, 67, 66, 51, 79, 42-Orange,
58 47, 62, 85. Orange. I lost the thread.

 The Heritage Lotto provides critical funding to most UK conservation efforts.

Orange.

 Forget the garnishes and play the Lotto.

Orange.

Yeah, that’s right.

 

 

 

 

 

061122.Nympsfield, Blah, Blah…Blacksheep

November 22, 2006 at 12:09 AM | Posted in countryside, Gloucestershire, Nymsfield, Sheep, Trees | 6 Comments

Here’s some green to soothe everyone’s eye cones after yesterday’s vicious Japanese Maple. I’ve really enjoyed this picture myself, have had it on as the desktop image.

061013.053.Glos.Nympsfield.WoodchesterMansion

Have you ever walked into an old hospital and seen “hospital green?” I don’t believe it’s too prevalent anymore.

The concept of green interiors for hospitals germinated from their presence in surgery rooms. It was believed that a surgeon, deeply engrossed in cutting up someone on the slab, would be overwhelmed by blood. Well, not necessarily blood but its crimson color. Should the good surgeon look up while in the thick of stitching up someone’s internal organs, he (and yes, he is appropriate since this theory is dated) would be utterly confused by the surrounding wall colors, since he had used up his red cones by staring at the blood. When he looked up, having exhausted his red cones, the world would be green, despite his earlier memories of the wall. This might bring on headaches and very likely distraction, which you don’t want while your patient is cut up and covered in blood.

The solution was to paint the hospital green, so there would be little difference between the surgeon’s perception of the surrounding walls and his memory of it.

So stare at the future sweaters and lamb dinners for a minute and then quickly look up:

Blood, Blood everywhere! Ahh!

That’s the theme of today’s post, which matches an anniversary in the States, (though not the one below).

From the Parking Lot is Full

 

 

This letter is being written only an hour before I leave for the Hilton hotel. Jodie, I’m asking you to please look into your heart and at least give [me] the chance, with this historical deed, to gain your love and respect.

I love you forever,
John W. Hinkley

 

.

Did anyone remember that this guy’s middle initial was “dubya?” Odd. Guess he liked it more than being called “Junior.”

061121.Westonbirt, Hang In There, Lil’Buddy

November 21, 2006 at 12:15 AM | Posted in Gardens & Parks, Gloucestershire, Overcast, Preservation, Trees, Westonbirt | 6 Comments

Acer Palmatum

s. Matsumarae

Japanese Maple ssp.

061114.180.Glos.Westonbirt.Acer Palmatum.JapMaple

I have no idea what any of that means but the classification does not apply to the photos below: enjoy.

061114.115.Glos.Westonbirt061114.116.Glos.Westonbirt

 

061120.Bath, “How Hard It Is To Die.”

November 20, 2006 at 12:02 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Chisel Marks, Conservation, countryside, Gardens & Parks, Monuments and Memorials, Preservation, River Avon, Sculpture, somerset, towns, Trees | 1 Comment

060928.10.Bath.St James Cemetery

St. Jam es Cemetery, south of the Avon, between Lower Bristol Road and the Great Western railroad tracks. Again, this is just a Victorian Era cemetery with most of the graves dating from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries and many of them were recent burials, nothing at all special here, except that just like the cemetery near Beckford’s Tower, this one is in total disrepair! This isn’t that old! Why do Victorian cemeteries never appear to be conserved here? Please tell me this is recent vandalism!

When I lived in Copenhagen, Denmark, I was a little astonished about the grave policies in some of the rural churchyards. I would look at their spectacularly old brick churches and the graves around them, only to discover they were all from the 1980s, 1960s, late 20th century in general. Upon inquiring at a few churches, I was informed that there, the land is leased in twenty year segments, with the option to pay for several leases at one time or have a family member renew the lease. The redevelopment of Århus with Arne Jacobsen incredibly famous rådhus (town hall) there was placed in the center of the city in open land. The city is medieval, how the heck was that land free to develop? Ah, it was a medieval Christian cemetery adjacent to an old Jewish cemetery. Attempts were made to angle the building so as to preserve the Jewish cemetery, but the other one was excavated for basement storage. (Ironically, I’m sure for death certificate records.)

Today’s title quote comes from the last words of Spanish fascist dictator Generalissimo Francisco Franco who died on this day in1975 after having 3/5 of his stomach removed.

Incidentally, happy birthday to a (hopefully) loyal DP viewer.

061119.Bath, King: “I Had a Dream!”

November 19, 2006 at 12:32 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Conservation, Crowns, cumulus clouds, gargoyles, Ladders, Light and Shadow, Olive Trees, Preservation, Restoration, Ruins, Sculpture, somerset, Stained Glass, stairs, Towers, towns | 7 Comments

061002.123.Somset.Bath

Then he [Jacob] dreamed, and behold, a ladder was set up on the Earth, and its top reached to heaven; and there the angels of God were ascending and descending on it.

–Genesis 28:12

Firstly, don’t even think of looking up the skirts of these angels: they’re genderless…and God will know if you try. Weekends typically kill viewership so I was going to play it easy but here’s the story on the west façade (although it was briefly mentioned back in the first Hokusai post):

When the former secretary to Henry VII, Bishop Oliver King, came to his new diocese he found the old large Norman Church in a state of grave disrepair and so endeavored to get the King to pay for a new Cathedral.

Owing his ecclesiastical office (See earlier “Investitures Conflict”) to his former secretarial duties and far from being concerned with civil rights in 1499, King had a dream in which angels ascended and descended a ladder from heaven and a voice spoke to him proclaiming: “Let an olive establish the crown and a king restore the Church.” (See the built image here.) I should add that by King, I mean Bishop King. And that the actual king probably responded by having an equally vivid dream in which God told him to let his former secretary pay for it. Anyway, the royal master masons (Robert and William Virtue) were used, which explains the similarity between its fan vaulting interior and that of Cambridge’s King’s College Chapel. It is the last large scale medieval cathedral constructed in England.

It’s all very confusing since not only is there a King, king, Oliver, and olive in this story but the actual king, Henry VII, was eager to shore up his “crown” image since he had just established his dynasty. This Tudor dynasty was born out of overthrowing the “evil” Yorkist Richard III* and ended the War of the Roses (dynastic civil war) by “uniting” the families of Lancaster and York. (Actually, he just married a York and then the happy couple spent their Honeymoon and subsequent marriage executing the wife’s entire family on trumped up charges.) His son was Henry VIII so you can just imagine the mother-in-law jokes of the Tudor Court!

Clearly Bath Abbey wasn’t just a dreamed folly (built) but part of God’s divine plan. God willed a Cathedral there, or rather a new cathedral there (3rd on the site!), or rather a new bi-cathedral there (since the “cathedra” is split with Wells, making it the diocese of Bath and Wells.)

Or as Bishop Jocelin would put it: “…the folly isn’t mine. It’s God’s Folly. Even in the old days He never asked men to do what was reasonable. Men can do that for themselves. They can buy and sell, heal and govern. But then out of some deep place comes the command to do what makes no sense at all–to build a ship on dry land; to sit among the dunghills; to marry a whore; to set their son on the altar of sacrifice. Then, if men have faith, a new thing comes.” (Excerpt from William Golding’s The Spire, 1964…pick up a copy, much better than Lord of the Flies)

And new things did come: Reformation, which made this structure redundant and caused it to be sold at auction a mere three decades after King’s dream.

060927.07.Bath.Abbey.WestFacade.Angels Climbing Jacob’s Ladder to heavenMy favorite aspect of the Jacob’s Ladder is its uninterupted spanning of the windows. And despite their stone wings, the angel’s share a valuable safety lesson with us mere humans: NEVER CLIMB A LADDER WHILE HOLDING ONTO THE OUTSIDE RAILINGS SINCE IF YOU SLIP YOU WILL SLIDE DOWN. (Somewhere on this facade must be the equally famous Nilda instruction: NEVER EVER SHAKE A BABY) God bless the angels and fundamentally basic safety procedures.

There’s a feeling I get when I look to the west
And my spirit is crying for leaving
In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees
And the voices of those who stand looking

Woe oh oh oh oh oh
And she’s buying a stairway to heaven

Led Zeppelin

 *Please note Paul Trevor Bale left a concerned comment on this ironic characterization that is well worth reading.

061118.Bath, ‘X’ Marks the Spots: Conserve Some, Remove Others

November 18, 2006 at 4:07 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, Chisel Marks, Conservation, Ladders, Preservation, Restoration, Ruins, Salisbury, Sculpture, somerset, Uncategorized, Wiltshire | 3 Comments

061026.097.Somset.Bath.Abbey.West.St Andrew Statue

 

Figure of St. Andrew

Date:1500-1540
Height: 60 inches
Width: 20 inches
Depth: c8 inches

061117.1.Somset.Bath.Abbey.RolandNewman.DecayandConsofStone.MMEver stare at something for a long time? I’ve been watching this west facade of Bath Abbey like a hawk, which is why the statues and their surroundings have bothered me. At the Salisbury lecture, I learned that Salisbury’s west facade has the most preserved medieval stonework (mostly plain ashlars) even though most of its façade statuary was clearly Victorian (they’re wearing wigs, etc.) from Gilbert Scott’s notorious true “restoration.” Scott demolished anything that was built after the cathedral was first completed, and rearranged the remaining original fabric of the interior to make it symmetrical. His actions were a contributing impetus for conservation studies.

Anyway, I took this photo of St. Andrew (and several other statues) a while back and then found a case study on it by Roland Newman examining the previous restorations of the statue and the late 1990s conservation efforts that resulted in what you see above. The main efforts seem to have been removing the previous restoration addition’s use of cement and replacing it with a built-up sacrificial layer of lime mortar.

There have been four major restorations of the abbey:
1833 G.P. Manners
1860-73 Gilbert Scott: his work here was the considered scholarly and responsible (having gone in and replaced or removed most of Manner’s altercations)
1900 Thomas Jackson
1957-1960 (I believe carried out by English Heritage)
And the late 1990s conservation efforts by English Heritage.

The canopy around St Andrew is carved from Clipsham stone and dates from 1900, as much of the Bath stone weathers poorly. (This is infamously seen by its poor performance in the restoration of Henry VII’s Westminster Abbey Chapel, London.) Newman provides a very good explanation on the causes of decay at Bath Abbey, and Bath in general. “The weather in Bath is mainly from the South West, so the parts of the stone facing in that direction get perpetually washed whist those facing in other directions do not. This gives rise to mechanical erosion on one side of a figure and a build up of dirt and salts on the other.” (Newman, 17. See citation below.)

Will answer the demands of the Ruth, Natalie, and JC in tomorrow’s post.

 

 

 

 

061117.2.Somset.Bath.Abbey.RolandNewman.DecayandConsofStone.MM061117.4.Somset.Bath.Abbey.RolandNewman.DecayandConsofStone.MM

Except for the top photo, all information diagrams and the second photo above come from

Roland Newman, The Decay and Conservation of Stone. Thesis (MSc). (Bath: University of Bath: 2000).

061117.Bath, Abbey Memorial Day Display Finally Displayed

November 17, 2006 at 1:25 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Bath Abbey, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Flowers, Foggy & Misty, Ladders, Monuments and Memorials, Overcast, somerset, Tabernacles | 1 Comment

061113.13.Somset.Bath.Abbey.Church Yard.Armistice Day Display

It’s still up. I only saw it recently, several days after Memorial Day.

See previous Armistice/Memorial/Veteran‘s Day post here.

 

061113.10.Somset.Bath.Abbey061113.12.Somset.Bath.Abbey.Church Yard.Armistice Day Display

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