070311.Weston, All Saints Pevsner Architectural Church Chat

March 11, 2007 at 1:15 AM | Posted in Architecture, Bath, Cathedrals and churches, cemeteries - churchyards - and tombstones, Monuments and Memorials, Pevsner, somerset, Tabernacles, Weston | 9 Comments

070306.068.Somset.Bath.Weston.AllSaints.d.Pinch.1830-2
Summarized from All Saints’ Website:
An early church is mentioned by Pope Adrian IV in a 1156 Bull. Jordanus, the first vicar, arrives at Weston in 1297. In the 15th Century, “All Hallows” Church is built but is demolished in 1830 to create a larger space for a growing community with only its original tower surviving. The church bells were recast by Thomas Belbie at Chewstoke in 1739, and were repaired and retuned between 1952-1953.

The new church of “All Saints” was consecrated on June 2, 1832. It shares some similarities with Pinch’s other works at St. Mary the Virgin, Bathwick and St. Saviour, Larkhall, although both of those examples were newbuilds and are defined by tall western towers, whereas All Saints is more diminished. New seating with new transcepts and a chancel were added between 1880 and 1893, and new “clergy and choir vestries were added in 1909.”[1] The church furnishings and internal program have been remodeled several times since then and recently a restoration was undertaken of the tower. Near the tower door is a 19th century font, and on the West Gallery are displayed William and Mary’s royal coat of arms.

On the south aisle there is the St Alphege window, which “commemorates the famous saint whom tradition says was born in Weston (St Alphege became the Abbot of Bath Abbey and then Archbishop of Canterbury). Also depicted is Guthram, King of the Danes, submitting to King Alfred and accepting Christianity.” In the south transept, there is a “monument to Alderman Sherston dated 1641. He was Mayor of Bath in 1632. “In a niche in the north wall of the chancel is found the oldest monument in the church from the 12-13th century. This is a stone coffin lid that was found under the south porch during the rebuilding of the church in 1830.” Other monuments include a 1699 honoring John Harrington of Kelston, a monument to “Dr William Oliver (of biscuit fame) whose family owned Weston Manor for many years.”[1]

There are over 90 tablets in the churchyard and many more within the church with some going back to the 12th Century. The church kept excellent records which indicated that most of those buried here had no connection with the town but chose the spot for their final repose because it was an idyllically isolated community far from the smog and congestion of Bath. This popularity lasted for over 200 years. I’ll post more on this later but one includes Thomas Baldwin’s monument to Thomas Warr Attwood.
070306.067.Somset.Bath.Weston.AllSaints.d.Pinch.1830-2
There are over 90 tablets in the churchyard and many more within the church with some going back to the 12th Century. The church kept excellent records which indicated that most of those buried here had no connection with the town but chose the spot for their final repose because it was an idyllically isolated community far from the smog and congestion of Bath. This popularity lasted for over 200 years. I’ll post more on this later but one includes Thomas Baldwin’s monument to Thomas Warr Attwood.

“Other than the simple C15 Perp[endicular] w[est] tower, the church was rebuilt in 1830-2 by John Pinch the Younger. E Harbottle of Exeter added the chancel and transecpts in 1893m and Mowbray A. Green a memorial chapel in 1921. Nave and aisles. Tall lancet-like three-light windows with four-centred arches and Perp tracery. Battlemetns and pinnacles. Arcade of tall piers of Perp section carrying four-centred arches. The nave is broad and low with a rear gallery….” [2]
“Plate: Chalice and Cover 1572; Apostle Spoon 1614; Chalice and Paten 1692; Flagon 1739. ” [3]

1-2: All Saints, Weston Web site
3: Michael Forsyth, Bath (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 295.
4: Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: North Somerset and Bristol, (Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1958), 334.

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9 Comments »

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  1. Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay cool JBoy!

    But ya know? I think I’ve reached maximum velocity for churches lately!

    BUT DON’T GET ME WRONG!! I LOVE this shot…and all the technicalities…is it ok if I read it over my evening glass of wine tonite? ;)

    If ya need some rockin’ CA stuff…come check out my new template….I paniced today and thought I lost the WHOLE BLOG but thank God, I was SPARED!

    Must be all the CHURCH that has come into my life!
    ;)

  2. 1156? 1641? Sheesh, I keep forgetting how new the US is.

    That second shot is a panoramic collage! I am impressed at your Photoshopping abilities, your eye for this sort of thing, and those windows. Dayam.

  3. The clock in the first photo works? Propably not, it stopped at 12.55 :) Wonderful old church, wonderful shot!

  4. My ancester Joseph Ennever (sometimes spelt Enever) is supposedly buried near the churchyard of All Saints. Although his burial is in the parish register as entered April 26 1807 it is likely he is buried just outside the consectrated land as he was hanged at Ilchester on April 22, 1807 for the crime of forging Bank of England notes(criminals were not allowed to be buried in churchyards). See the website wwww.ennever.com for further info on him and his brother George. any info on the Ennever name in Bath and surrounding area would be much appreciated

  5. Interesting, I plan to post graves of All Saints shortly since the churchyard has been the subject of a great many conservation projects but this allows me to recite a fact I recently learned. Criminals were sometimes allowed to be buried in churchyards, but only on the cold northern side of the church. The best place to be buried was either in the church (under the altar=best, nave=common OK) or directly behind the chancel (or the rest of the east end of a churchyard). South and west were also various degrees of acceptability, but the north was for criminals. Because graves were recycled frequently, this burial formula is quite useful in determining the lives marked by tombstones and why you often don’t find elaborate pre-1850 (date of the Burial Act that forbid the recycling of graves) tombstones on the north sides of churches–officially after 1850 (although really after mid 1790s) all land around churches became scarce and the old traditions were abandoned.

    The main reason I upload these photos of churches is for google searches to help genealogists looking for images to connect with ledger names.

  6. 1790s

  7. Greetings…
    Looking for the burial site of Sir Charles Henry Frankland, Baronet
    about January 1768… a marker with engraving by his wife…Lady Agnes Frankland was errected by her at that time…need information for visit to the site…I believe it was Weston Church at Bath…Would this be the correct place?
    Thank you..
    Ms. Phyllis

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